‘Bronze’ open access supersedes green and gold | Nature Index "Publishers can deny access to the majority of open-access articles at their discretion."
‘Bronze’ open access supersedes green and gold
My latest for Nature index: Charting the rise of #OpenAccess and the curious not-quite-there "bronze" OA category. Featuring
Depressing: "Publishers can deny access to the majority of open-access articles at their discretion." - 'Freely available', but inappropriately licensed. #oscibar
Bronze #openaccess supersedes green and gold; publishers can deny access to the majority of open-access articles.
More complaints that "bronze" open access isn't really open access. Which is why many prefer the term "public access". Still, impressive that publishers voluntarily make more stuff free than green OA and gold OA combined.
The browser extension finds legal copies of journal articles when you hit a paywall. New study from et al used Unpaywall data to track #openaccess status of papers people want to read. My latest for Nature Index
“Most open-access articles are not accompanied by a license, severely curtailing their use, a recent survey of 100,000 articles sampled from the CrossRef database has revealed.”
Much to be said about the growing Bronze #openaccess category: free content without a proper license: . Article based on this study: in which important follow-up questions are addressed.
"Most #openaccess articles are not accompanied by a license, severely curtailing their use, a recent survey of 100,000 articles sampled from the CrossRef database has revealed." #bronzeOA
Let's face it.. ‘Bronze’ OA is not #OpenAccess - "Without a license, articles are free to read, but can’t be redistributed or reused" | Nature Index by via
Q: When drafting a new paper about discipline-specific #OA publishing practices w colleagues from Switzerland and the UK, the question came up if „bronze“ #OA (free-to-read version of an article on a publisher website) is #openaccess at all? Opinions?