1. On this 75th anniversary of D-Day, read SLA Marshall’s “First Wave at Omaha Beach.”
“But to follow that rule slights the story of Omaha as an epic human tragedy which in the early hours bordered on total disaster.”
The best article I can find, at hand, on the horrors of Omaha beach is this, from The Atlantic. Read only when ready. #DDay #DDay75years
“They return to the water to use it for body cover. Faces turned upward, so that their nostrils are out of water, they creep toward the land at the same rate as the tide. That is how most of the survivors make it”
The horror of D-Day shouldn’t be sanitized. Read this.
I left this account to the end of the day on purpose. It is a retelling of the horror the first men to land on Omaha faced on #DDay . Do not read it if you have a weak constitution. I am serious. It haunts me and I've heard many stories firsthand.
“Unlike what happens to other great battles, the passing of the years and the retelling of the story have softened the horror of Omaha Beach on D Day.”
Never read this before. Unreal bravery.
Must-read on D-Day anniversary about Omaha Beach fight. Here's one sentence: "In the command boat, Captain Ettore V. Zappacosta pulls a Colt .45 and says: 'By God, you'll take this boat straight in."
Every D-Day I reread 'First Wave at Omaha Beach', one of the most gripping pieces of war reporting I've ever read
Your long read of the day. First Wave at Omaha Beach
A shout out to my deceased uncle Anthony who hit the beach on that fateful day. He was wounded but stayed through Potsdam. He made our Nana so proud to be American. 🇺🇸
To truly appreciate the sacrifice made by these great heroes on D-Day, you need to read the summaries of the actual battlefield notes - It’s stunning and should be mandatory reading for all subsequent generations. #DDayRemembered
"Faces turned upward, so that their nostrils are out of water, they creep toward the land at the same rate as the tide. That is how most of the survivors make it."
First Wave at Omaha Beach, by S. L. A. Marshall