This is a terrific piece on (mis)interpretations of the gorilla and basketball experiment, but also makes a deeper point: theory comes first before evidence can count as evidence.
the problem of "gotcha" experiments in science, particularly cognitive psychology and behavioral economics
A new interpretation of a classic psychology experiment will change your view of perception, judgment – even human nature. Editor’s pick 2018:
"there is no neutral observation. The world doesn’t tell us what is relevant. Instead, it responds to questions. When looking & observing, we are usually directed toward something, toward answering specific questions or satisfying some curiosities"
Perception is not a process of passive recording – what we notice and see is shaped by our questions, expectations, and interests. On the fallacy of obviousness. Editor’s pick 2018:
“However, computers and algorithms – even the most sophisticated ones – cannot address the fallacy of obviousness. Put differently, they can never know what might be relevant.” This is really such a great piece. Highly recommend.
‘Deciding what is relevant and meaningful, and what is not, are vital to intelligence and rationality’: rethinks the famous ‘fail to see the man in a gorilla suit’ experiment
Perception is not a process of passive recording – what we notice and see is shaped by our questions, expectations, and interests. On the fallacy of obviousness:
On The Fallacy of Obviousness ... A new interpretation of a classic psychology experiment will change your view of perception, judgment – even human nature ...
“Are humans truly blind to the obvious? Recent research suggests that this claim – so important to much of the cognitive sciences, behavioural economics, & now AI – is wrong.” by
The famous "Gorilla" video shows how we can be blind to the obvious. But this powerful essay by argues that our blindness is not the failing it's usually made out to be.
A new interpretation of a classic psychology experiment might just change your view of perception, judgment and even human nature itself! #appsych #apecon #apstats
In any given perceptual scene, there are plenty of details that are 'self-evident'. What we notice, though, is determined by what we're looking for, and failing to notice extraneous details does not mean we're 'blind to the obvious'.
"There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact". Why we should question assumptions from behavioural science via
. politely, respectfully, takes a closer look at some experimental data on which behavioral economics and some of the cognitive sciences have been built. And the results are devastating. via
The fallacy of obviousness: If the famous gorilla experiment (Kahneman) doesn’t illustrate that humans are blind to the obvious, then what exactly does it illustrate? — Thoughtful (a.o. about AI) piece by on
"...obviousness depends on what is deemed to be relevant for a particular question or task at hand. Rather than passively accounting for or recording everything directly in front of us …instead actively look for things.” ^Reinterp. of #GorillaExperiment
Not everything that is obvious is relevant and meaningful - great read for the hypothesis generator – via
Excellent article that insightfully probes the assumptions that too many psychologists and behavioral economics naively take for granted. The fallacy of obviousness, by
Are humans really blind to the gorilla on the basketball court? – via
“After all, many of the most significant scientific discoveries resulted not from reams of data or large amounts of computational power, but from a question or theory.” Are humans really blind to the gorilla on the basketball court? | Aeon
Rethinking the famous gorilla on the basketball court experiment. Is it mind that constructs world, or world that constructs mind? – via
Umwelt: Essay by as "The fallacy of obviousness" Target article "Rationality, perception, and the all-seeing eye"
Dreadful waffly pseudo-academic article that attacks Kahneman, poses a question, lobs loads of irrelevant...
what a load of...well. #psycho #Psychological
"But the very notion of visual prominence or obviousness is extremely tricky to define scientifically, as one needs to consider relevance or, to put differently, obviousness to whom and for what purpose?" #Pragmatism via
Are humans really blind to the gorilla on the back ball court? By ⁦
"There is no neutral observation. The world doesn’t tell us what is relevant. Instead, it responds to questions."
‘Whether you can observe a thing or not depends on the theory which you use. It is the theory which decides what can be observed.’ Albert Einstein (1926) –
The fallacy of obviousness — A new interpretation of a classic psychology experiment will change your view of perception, judgment – even human nature
The fallacy of obviousness A new interpretation of a classic psychology experiment will change your view of perception, judgment – even human nature
against "gotcha" experiments in science, particularly cognitive psychology and behavioral economics
Thanks, This is a good piece. (Albeit somewhat obvious.)
Are humans really blind to the gorilla on the basketball court? – via
This was really a weird commentary on the invisible gorilla
h/t: brilliant photo by Belgian photographer Harry Gruyaert of cooperative, perfectly captures the fallacy of obviousness --- so tell me: what's happening in this photo? --- major thanks to Aeon photo editor Andy Samson
Are humans blind to the obvious? the fallacy of obviousness
Are humans really blind to the gorilla on the basketball court? – via
The great psychologist Daniel Kahneman says we're blind to the obvious, and also to our own blindness, as demonstrated by the famous 'Gorillas in Our Midst' video. But perhaps we're just good a focusing on what's important to at any given moment
Are humans really blind to the gorilla on the basketball court? – Teppo Felin | Aeon Essays
Are humans really blind to the gorilla on the basketball court? – via
The fallacy of obviousness In any given perceptual scene, there are plenty of details that are ‘self-evident’. What we notice, though, is determined by what we’re looking for & failing to notice extraneous details doesn’t mean we’re ‘blind to the obvious’
Terrific read abt human & theory-building in era of AI & behavioral econ: "Humans do a remarkable job of generating questions, expectations, hypotheses & theories that direct their awareness & attn toward what is relevant, useful & novel..." #ethics
"Are humans really blind to the gorilla on the basketball court?" – via
The fallacy of obviousness