Retractions are up ~40x since 2000; # of papers published is up just 2-3x. Growth in retraction far outpaces growth in published papers. Would recommend this for trends, based on our database
Lots of interesting presentations on retractions at #WCRI2019. We'd be happy to make our entire database -- far more comprehensive than WoS or PubMed -- available to scholars who want to pursue such research: More info: … 1/2
Massive database reveals that years of blatant misconduct in the Matson saga resulted in zero retracted papers never mind harms to autistics
An analysis of retractions since 1970 is published in Science, concluding that the increase in retractions in recent years might reflect better editorial practices. Not all retractions involve misconduct. #PostPublication #Retraction
Two years ago today, we launched the Retraction Watch Database, working with at to analyze what was then 18,500 retractions. Today, that's more than 22,000 in .
For context, Australia's rate is 17th out of 43 when normalized by countries' R&D spending (for those OECD countries with data on retractions and R&D spending) and 26/52 when normalized by number of papers published (paper data from NSF). More here
Rethinking retractions: the largest-ever database of retracted articles suggests the burgeoning numbers reflect better oversight, not a crisis in science via
What a massive database of retracted papers reveals about science publishing’s ‘death penalty’
"The majority of retractions have involved scientific fraud (fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism) or other kinds of misconduct (such as fake peer review)." #retraction
What a massive database of retracted papers reveals about science publishing’s ‘death penalty’ via
What a massive database of retracted papers reveals about science publishing’s ‘death penalty’ via &
Retraction is the publisher saying, "Oops, we shouldn't have published this." That's why they're rare.
Insightful look at retractions of research papers in using data from . Worth a read: #peerreview
What a massive database of retracted papers reveals about science publishing’s ‘death penalty’
What a massive database of retracted papers reveals about science publishing’s ‘death penalty’