1. The toughest criticism of 's viral monologue has come not from the Left but from the Right ( & ). But the thrust of his argument about the working class family is not wrong.
"Elites need to come to acknowledge their personal responsibility for bridging the class divide that has emerged on so many fronts," argue and
"Declines in working-class marriage—and all the pathologies that have followed in their wake—cannot be divorced from policy and cultural choices that elites have made," argue and
“Conservatives need to think more seriously about the role that contemporary capitalism, public policy, and culture have played in eroding the strength and stability of working-class family life.” and via
Thought provoking from ⁦⁩ “In private, however, well-educated elites overwhelmingly value stable marriage for themselves and their kids.”
Yes. Good piece by & . "Our elites had too much faith in a laissez-faire ideology that sees labor markets as automatically self-correcting but, in fact, exacted a terrible toll on scores of working-class families..."
Worth reading this entire piece from
"Appealing to a lack of virtue on the part of the poor or the working class is at best a category error, and at worst an all-purpose rhetorical device for neutralizing responsibility on the part of elite policy makers." & on Tuck
File under things I thought I'd never say: Tucker Carlson has recently got some important things right. Well, I didn't say it, exactly; 's did. And I think he's right.
Did laissez-faire conservatives help undermine working-class marriage? Interesting debate among conservatives via
"Elites need to come to acknowledge their personal responsibility for bridging the class divide that has emerged on so many fronts," argue and
"Elites need to come to acknowledge their personal responsibility for bridging the class divide that has emerged on so many fronts," argue and
Even a stopped clock is right twice a day. An uncomfortable piece by
The breakdown in marriage among the white working class has sparked an intramural conservative debate in recent days: #Ed2020
“Carlson fingers bad public policies, market forces, and cultural developments for eroding the economic, social, and cultural foundations of family life in working-class America.” /// Worth your time from ⁦⁩ and ⁦⁩.
"Elites need to come to acknowledge their personal responsibility for bridging the class divide that has emerged on so many fronts," argue and
I do not personally lean as heavily as my friend ⁦⁩ does on economic factors in marriage decline, but nonetheless, I think this is a really important article and conversation that Christians are uniquely positioned to contribute.
ICYMI as I did, this is a devastatingly good defense of what was true in Tucker Carlson's recent monologue on trade, the market & the family, and how "laissez faire" excess harmed workers. Via & .
Useful for to consider. is not to be dismissed. "Lack of virtue of the poor or working class is at best a category error, worst an all-purpose rhetorical device for neutralizing responsibility of elite policy makers."
A few quick points on the Tucker Wars, to which this was my partial contribution
"Elites need to come to acknowledge their personal responsibility for bridging the class divide that has emerged on so many fronts," argue and
“Contemporary capitalism, small government conservatism, and elite negligence have all played a role in the fall of the working-class family.”
8. And this is not just about economics & public policy, it's also about culture. E.g., elites have ceased to support a *public* marriage-friendly culture even as they embrace marriage in *private* for themselves and their kids.
1. Fascinating how much convergence seeing from thoughtful observers on Left and Right re: the predicament of working class in America
Interesting argument here
6. There is no question that the China trade shock of the last two decades, for instance, exacted a serious toll on working-class jobs, working-class families, and working-class marriage. Hard to chalk this up to personal irresponsibility.
10. Elites of all ideological stripes need to attend to our - Economic - Policy - Civic & - Cultural responsibilities in bridging the class divide.
Here is the evidence. From . Though I wouldn't necessarily use the term devastated. But this is not nothing.
6. This view fails to appreciate how public policy choices--e.g., about education, trade, & welfare policy--have had a disparate impact on poor and working class Americans and their families, a point & I make here
5. Again, 's work also indicates changes in the economy have had a hand in undercutting marriage among less-educated men.
Seems to me that differences in IQ and self-control likely explain most of these disparities.
4. And, of course, that's not to minimize the serious economic and public policy issues facing working-class families in the U.S.