The origins of speech are still a mystery for evolutionary theorists – could ideophones, a set of words that evoke an idea in sound, hint at the development of language?
A special class of vivid, textural words defy linguistic theory: could ‘ideophones’ unlock the secrets of humans’ first utterances?
“Known as ideophones, they are considered to be especially vivid and evocative of sensual experiences. Crucially, you do not need to know the language to grasp a hint of their meaning.” via
Are there universal sensations – of sliminess, smoothness or speed – that certain sounds can trigger? on the deep evolutionary significance of linguistic 'ideophones'
You know how I love a quiz? Take a look at these Japanese words and see if you can guess the meaning. As I explain in my new piece for , you will score better than chance - and that tells us some surprising things about the nature of language.
A special class of vivid, textural words defy linguistic theory: could ‘ideophones’ unlock the secrets of humans’ first utterances? Interesting piece from
Lovely essay on ideophones – or the relationship between sound and meaning – by
"...the iconic associations between sound and meaning could have offered a starting point for the group to develop a shared lexicon." [email protected]_a_robson in
Words as feelings – In the beginning was the word, and the word was embodied A special class of vivid, textural words defy linguistic theory: could ‘ideophones’ unlock the secrets of humans’ first utterances?
Can 'ideophones'--words whose sound evokes a meaning--teach us how language first came to happen? via
In the beginning was the word, and the word was embodied – via
In the beginning was the word, and the word was embodied – via
There is a special class of vivid, textural words that one can discern the meaning of — in a foreign tongue — just based on the sound. ‘Ideophones’ might unlock the secrets of humans’ first utterances. via
Must-read article by ⁦⁩ on embodiment-language relations. But if ideophones are more prevalent in some languages than others, what does this tell us, if anything, for cultural differences in how we experience our bodies?| Aeon Essays