Scientists know little about the natural history of cancer -- when it appeared in vertebrates, and why. A growth on the femur of a long-extinct animal confirms that cancer has been with vertebrates almost from the beginning.
The cancerous leg bone of a 240-million-year-old Pappochelys, a shell-less ancestor of turtles, is the oldest known case of cancer in an amniote, a group that includes reptiles, birds and mammals
The Patient Had Bone Cancer. The Diagnosis Arrived 240 Million Years Too Late. via
Scientists know little about the natural history of cancer -- when it appeared in vertebrates, and why. A growth on the femur of a long-extinct animal confirms that cancer has been with vertebrates almost from the beginning.
Scientists know little about the natural history of cancer -- when it appeared in vertebrates, and why. A growth on the femur of a long-extinct animal confirms that cancer has been with vertebrates almost from the beginning.
If only this turtle had met ⁦⁩ it might not have gone extinct!
Cancer has been around for a very long time. 240 million-year-old femur from ancient turtle ancestor shows malignant bone tumour
The Patient Had Bone Cancer. The Diagnosis Arrived 240 Million Years Too Late. - The New York Times #JamaOnc