The U.S. is a very rich country that looks more like a developing nation based on a host of different metrics, writes via
America is riddled with: 💰 corruption 🏗️ inefficient bidding 🏡 high land-acquisition costs 👷🏻‍♂️ overstaffing 🚧 regulatory barriers 🙅🏽‍♀️ poor maintenance All of these inefficiencies add up to a country that has forgotten how to build
The U.S. is a very rich country that looks more like a developing nation based on a host of different metrics, writes via
The fall in construction productivity and the rise in health costs suggest that inequality isn't the whole story here. The U.S. is simply becoming less efficient along a broad spectrum of metrics
America’s growing corruption and costs, crumbling infrastructure and worsening outcomes all suggest that economic development is going the wrong way
America's wealth masks a number of glaring areas more dysfunctional than our peers: - worse health outcomes for higher costs - costs much more to build train tracks than in heavily unionized France - declining life expectancy - housing affordability crisis
America’s growing corruption and costs, crumbling infrastructure and worsening outcomes all suggest that economic development is going the wrong way
My anecdotal conclusion has always been that the US is a zeroth world society living alongside a third world one, and apparently that's an increasingly accurate characterization. From the indefatigable .
The U.S. is a very rich country that looks more like a developing nation based on a host of different metrics, writes via
Can a country undevelop? The U.S. will put that question to the test
America’s growing corruption and costs, crumbling infrastructure and worsening outcomes all suggest that economic development is going the wrong way
America’s growing corruption and costs, crumbling infrastructure and worsening outcomes all suggest that economic development is going the wrong way
The list of U.S. dysfunctions seems never-ending: 💊 opioid abuse 📈 rising suicide rates 🚱 lead contamination 🚔 large prison population 🗡️ violent crime rate 🥫 widespread poverty and hunger
The U.S.’s hybrid public-private health care system costs much more than other countries’ government-dominated systems. Despite this lavish spending, the U.S. tends to get worse health outcomes
The U.S. is still a very rich nation compared to Germany, Sweden, Japan, Canada or Denmark. But that wealth masks some glaring areas where the U.S. looks more dysfunctional than its peers, namely, construction costs, health care and housing affordability
The U.S. is a very rich country that looks more like a developing nation based on a host of different metrics, writes via
U.S. Is a Rich Country With Symptoms of a Developing Nation
The U.S. shouldn’t wait and see if current trends persist. Here's what needs to be done: 1) Reduce excessive costs in key industries 2) Improve public health 3) Increase density in cities 4) Upgrade public transit 5) Eliminate waste and corruption
How long can this loss of efficiency go on without hurting America's overall wealth? Nobody knows. If U.S. GDP does end up backsliding, it won't be the first rich country to do so in recent years. Italy has already traveled down that path 🇮🇹➡️ 
Thanks in part to high construction costs and in part to restrictions on housing development, America is also facing a housing-affordability crisis
U.S. infrastructure is in a state of disrepair. This raises a disturbing question: Is it possible for a rich, industrialized country to fall back into the middle ranks?
Five years ago, life expectancy, which is still rising in most other countries, began to fall in the U.S. 📉 Most countries have also seen declines in maternal mortality. But in the U.S., the rate has risen in recent years 📈 
by way of debt, the us is the poorest country on earth thanks to triffin dilemma, high debt means internal poverty, since borrowing migrates offshore
The U.S. is a very rich country that looks more like a developing nation based on a host of different metrics, writes via
Are we on the road to becoming #Italy? That’s not meant as a compliment.