The online journal eLife has created its first “computationally reproducible” article.
The online journal eLife has created its first “computationally reproducible” article.
Computational reproducibility in eLife with comments by and Tim Errington.
Um, ICYMI: "reproducible articles." See something in a figure that makes you go 🤔? eLife has published "the paper of the future," integrating data-related software w figures so YOU can tweak&see, eg, how it looks w/wo outliers, etc. by
Pioneering ‘live-code’ article allows scientists to play with each other’s results
New paper allows readers to redo code on the fly and change figures and outputs. No external programming package needed.
Read what says in a article about the online journal creating its first “computationally reproducible” article, in which figures are integrated with the software, data and computational environment required to produce them.
📈 is upgrading the research article to a multifaceted communication medium that includes the data and the code—I was quoted by for
A prototype of a fully computationally reproducible paper was recently published in , allowing readers to access all data and interact with the code behind each part of the analysis. We need more of this!
MAE Professor was recently quoted by on how the “live-code” article will allow the scientific article to become a “multifaceted communication medium that includes the data and the code as an integral part.”
, an Associate professor of Pharmacology comments in the nature article below: Pioneering ‘live-code’ article allows scientists to play with each other’s results
A thread on 's example of a live-code article is a great step forwards and very problematic. Lots of hard work integrating existing tech into publishers 👍, yet also recreating lots of tech instead of building on existing open tools and standards 👎
Tbh is so smart I only understand half the things he writes, but this piece on the embedded code in a model "paper of the future" is extremely interesting:
This "live-code" presentation of research results looks like a winner to enhance reproducibility and #openscience by by
📈 is upgrading the research article to a multifaceted communication medium that includes the data and the code—I was quoted by for
Pioneering ‘live-code’ article allows scientists to play with each other’s results. Very cool.
"eLife’s prototype lets scientists modify the software underlying figures to validate, build on, or better understand the work." #reproducibility #STEM
I love this! A Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology study republished in a reproducible format that "allows scientists to play with each other’s results"
Pioneering ‘live-code’ article allows scientists to play with each other’s results #opendata #openaccess #publishing #reproducibility