Brad DeLong captures the sentiment of many of us center-left policy wonks who spent much of our careers proposing reasonable policies that required or at-least presumed responsible center-right partner. We're kind of done with that, in light of experience
A few thoughts inspired by 's "I am no longer a neoliberal" piece. Brad is really saying two things: there is no center-right, so centrists must deal with the left, and market-oriented policies don't work as well as thought 1/
The most interesting thing I have read about American politics this week.
Very interesting idea from as interviewed by . Brad's essentially saying that neolibs need to abandon any pretense of the center-right existing, ride current wave of leftist energy, and work to make leftist policy proposals better.
someone tattoo this on every red state democrat elected last year
As good of a summary of the Obama years as any I've read:
If the choice is socialism or barbarism, too many in the center seem eager to choose barbarism. makes a strong case for choosing socialism.
Quite the quote from here. The full interview offers a solid realpolitik analysis of the state of Democratic politics.
I think that Labour’s very angry & frustrated centrists /right wing should take a leaf out of the book of Rubin Democrat & economics Professor Brad de Long’..
"The world appears to be more like what lefties thought it was than what I thought it was for the last 10 or 15 years.” Typically smart and forthright by Read this interview!
“The baton rightly passes to our colleagues on our left. We are still here, but it is not our time to lead.” [email protected]
I really wish the Dem establishment would listen to .
“Obama rolls into office with Romney’s health care policy, McCain’s climate policy, Clinton’s tax policy, and Bush’s foreign policy,” said. “And did Bush, Romney, McCain say a single good word about anything Obama did? No, they fucking did not”
Moderate, market-friendly Democrats will begin conceding to the far-left, rather than the far-right. It's not healthy for our country, but it's reality without a strong center-right, predicts .
nice clarifying interview
“There’s literally nobody on the right between those frantically accommodating Donald Trump, on the one hand, and [Democrats] on the other...except our brave friends...at the Niskanen Center.” - in a conversation with ’s .
Many people commenting on this interesting interview with . I've been more or less there for a long time; there will be no useful compromise with conservatives for the foreseeable future, and we need to be realistic about that 1/
i loved this interview. not just because delong points that the political alignment you need to support centrist policies does not exist, but because he is open about the fact that centrist policies are often not the best or most effective policies.
This is a very sensible argument from that seems to me to resolve down almost entirely to ending the filibuster and statehood for DC and Puerto Rico. If not, then without votes from Republicans, they (usually) can't pass anything big.
This is a really interesting interview of that does the kind of work that I think more policymakers under Clinton and Obama need desperately to do: a reflection on why the (neo)liberal political project failed.
"Obama rolls into office with Romney’s health care policy, McCain’s climate policy, Clinton’s tax policy, and George H.W. Bush’s foreign policy.” And yet the Republicans pursued scorched earth. on why the Dems must abandon centrism and move left.
It's a shame to see so many neoliberal Dems essentially issuing an unconditional surrender to the socialist left.
Brad DeLong elaborates his argument that centrist neoliberal “Rubin” democrats like himself have failed politically, and that leadership in the party should pass to those on the left.
Spoke with about his claim that neoliberals need to cede leadership of the Democratic Party to the left
If there are any staffers who haven't blocked me, can one of you please tape this interview to the office fridge?
Seriously, this is an incredibly thoughtful, retrospective piece on the shifting political economy of progressive policy reform in the United States
“The baton rightly passes to our colleagues on our left.” Excellent interview with about the changing nature of Democratic economic policymaking. I think the problems go deeper than just political though; I'll try and write up a response.
Niskanen advisory board member makes a pretty compelling case for why a politically and intellectually capable center-right (which we don't have right now) is critical to enact policies attractive to the center-left.
Republicans: behold your handiwork. A Clinton-era centrist Democrat explains why it’s time to give democratic socialists a chance via
"“The baton rightly passes to our colleagues on our left.” - great interview with
A pairing from : Read this (excellent) piece on how radicalism is now realism alongside the piece that makes the same point from the other side of the moderate/radical divide.
"The baton rightly passes to our colleagues on the Left" -
This, from , is very good political advice and even better policy advice
Great interview with , whom I'm proud to call my coauthor even if he is a neoliberal shill.
I’m basically where is right now. The dream of the 90s hasn’t ended for me, but it’s on hold due to current events.
Great interview w/ . I’m right there with him
Threat/Rant: So I'm a small fish, but 's interview and 's response seems like a welcome ceasefire the "neolib"/"socialist" internet war for the future of the left, and having been on both sides at some point I have some thoughts.
"The world appears to be more like what lefties thought it was than what I thought it was for the last 10 or 15 years." on why neoliberal Dems are better off moving to the left than always trying to woo the center-right crowd.
this interview is pretty fascinating for a lot of reasons but one thing I realized is how very rarely you hear centrist Democrats talk about the left and the right like this
this great interview is a reminder of how much today’s dysfunction stems from the complacency and opportunism of the “moderate” right
OG neoliberal shill passes the baton. Fascinating on the limitations of pursuing technocratic, market-oriented means to social democratic ends.
There a really excellent conversation on between and on what DeLong sees as the Democrats' necessary shift to the left. It deserves some thought. I don't mean by this what regular readers will have observed I often mean...
Kudos and wow. “The baton rightly passes to our colleagues on our left,” wrote. “We are still here, but it is not our time to lead.”
This interview with ⁦⁩ is worth a read. “[Centrist policies] depend on a responsible center-right partner to succeed. They’re premised on the understanding that at least a faction of the Republican Party would be willing [to work w Dems].”
This from is important on why the center-left is fine with tacking left rather than allying with the center-rght
Wow, this interview: "A Clinton-era centrist Democrat explains why it’s time to give democratic socialists a chance"
. is shrill. Worth reading.
Professor I always liked you, even when sometimes I didn't agree. This is the kind of attitude we need on the left, in both directions. Proves that my appreciation of you was well warranted
For the most part, Centrist/establishment/neoliberal/what-have-you Democrats very *unpragmatic* and naive about practical politics as it exists. ⁦⁩ is a magnificent exception here, a learning organism.
[Everybody’s pointing to this good interview which makes many of these points - that the GOP can’t be considered a governing partner at all, in any circumstance. ] 4/
Interesting thoughts from self-described "Rubin Democrat"
Someone misread me the other day, when I wrote of capitalism “mend it, don’t end it,” as dismissive of the logic of democratic socialism. Far from it — and this piece by , featuring , gets at why.
. interviews "Why does he believe that neoliberals’ time in the sun has come to an end? The core reason, DeLong argues, is political. The policies he supports depend on a responsible center-right partner to succeed"
explains why it’s time to give democratic socialists a chance #DemocraticSocialism
... makes a compelling argument. A Clinton-era centrist Democrat explains why it’s time to give democratic socialists a chance
Fascinating conversation in which tells that if we don’t have a healthy center-right, we may as well say “goodbye” to market-friendly policies. #Politics
There’s simply no political place for neoliberals to lead with good policies that address right-wing concerns. And so, right and left will remain polarized, with moderate Democrats conceding to the far-left, predicts .
A Clinton-era centrist Democrat ( ) explains why it’s time to give democratic socialists a chance
Don't think I've ever agreed harder with anything than this joint:
Must read interview with , especially for those of you pining for the days of triangulation & the Third Way.
1/ I agree with there's no point trying to forge center-left, center-right legislative alliances/compromises. I'm hazier on electoral alliance prospects. Just: policy will be better and the base won't shrink. Lose a few blue dogs but gain ... ?
1. I'll add to point that today it is more productive for centrists to work with the left - when I talk to grass roots Bernie supporters their main concerns are health care and jobs, as opposed to activists who are more into ideological purity.
"Rather than being a center-left coalition dominated by market-friendly ideas designed to attract conservative support, the energy of the coalition should come from the left and its broad, sweeping ideas" -- From
“policies that depended on there being a political-economic consensus to support them, as part of a broad agreement about America’s direction, are a lot worse as policies if that political-economic underpinning is not there.” ht
Brilliant on why Nissan Sentra cannot hold and neoliberalism should be put down for better times, cannot agree more
This interview with by gets right at the core of where pragmatism and ideology intersect in the ongoing jockeying for control of the future of the democratic party. Anyone with even cursory interest in the topic should read it.
You’ve got to read . I think he actually wrote about it at the time, the TARP vote shattered any illusion that the GOP is or could be a “normal” party and this is the world we now live in.
Think made this point well: And follow-up makes clear that the mistakes of technocrats/“neoliberals” were not just in political tactics employed but of many of the policies themselves:
Indeed ⤵️ Thank you for making that point! Cc From this article by ▶️ 
“It’s not often that someone in this policy debate — or, frankly, any policy debate — suggests that their side should lose.” Typical forthrightness by ⁦⁩ to do so in light of the “very, very strange people” on the other side! Worth a read.
#RT : This is a very sensible argument from that seems to me to resolve down almost entirely to ending the filibuster and statehood for DC and Puerto Rico. If not, then without votes from Republicans, they (usually) can't pass anything …
Too bad focuses on the politics here ('You have permission to move left') rather than policy--doesn't let "neoliberal" explain "how policies that we thought are going to be very effective are rather less effective."
Big point about this fascinating "passing the baton" idea that the brilliant is propounding: he is personally only 58 years old! Younger than some of the peeps he is passing the baton to!
It's good to see 's interview in Vox, profane emphasis and all, about the faithlessness of the GOP since Clinton. "No allegiance to truth on anything." Indeed
Whole generations of political operatives, media commentators, and academics feeling the earth moving beneath their feet... A Clinton-era centrist Democrat explains why it’s time to give democratic socialists a chance via
I am broadly in line with ’s views here on how to think about the rising left ... I think I said something similar to at an meeting a few years ago but never wrote it up.
An interesting political economy argument from that market-friendly Democrats should pass the baton to their left.
Why a neoliberal economist who worked in the Clinton administration thinks its time for centrist democrats to give support to a new generation of progressive policies. Compelling.
It's not a baton, it's a cattle prod...
7/Realizing that the safety net will always be sabotaged by the Republicans, and many other left-neoliberals are ready to throw in the towel and let social democrats - or even socialists - take the reins.
This piece by my still-hopefully-future podcast co-host Brad is very, very good.
This is an absolutely brilliant interview...but I do wonder whether passing the baton leftwards guarantees longterm policy success: folks on the Left would have to overcome a reenergized GOP; we see people retracting their #NeverTrump promises.
Brad DeLong on state of US politics post Koch money/Trump and why he has changed his position "The world appears to be more like what lefties thought it was than what I thought it was for the last 10 or 15 years"
He’s not wrong, . Doesn’t mean cranks and antisemitism are OK. But new ideas must come, and compromise with the centre right won’t bring anything
Centrist, market friendly, 'neoliberal'? Truly Orwellian. "Clinton-era centrist Democrat [Brad DeLong] makes the case for the left": "is one of the market-friendly, 'neoliberal' Democrats who have dominated the party for the last 20 years"
A Clinton-era centrist Democrat explains why it's time to give democratic socialists a chance - Vox via
This is absolutely fascinating--a market-oriented democrat saying he now things people like him should make coalition to their left, not their right, because the latter can't work today.
A Clinton-era centrist Democrat explains why it’s time to give democratic socialists a chance
A Clinton-era centrist Democrat explains why it’s time to give democratic socialists a chance
So rich that DeLong is offered as the standard bearer of New Dems
Delong blocked me. Now I know why. We are different species....
A Clinton-era centrist Democrat, one of the market-friendly, “neoliberal” Democrats who have dominated the party for the last 20 years, explains why it’s time to give democratic socialists a chance: “The baton rightly passes to our colleagues on our left”
DeLong argues that we tried teaching economics to the right, but at this point they're just beyond any hope. So we may as well have a crack at bringing good economics to the left instead
A Clinton-era centrist Democrat explains why it’s time to give democratic socialists a chance
Brad de Long: “There’s simply no political place for neoliberals to lead with good policies that make a concession to right-wing concerns.”