While national outlets worry about a president who calls the press an enemy of the people, many Americans no longer have someone watching the city council for them.
As local journalism fades, many Americans no longer have someone watching over their city council, chronicling the soccer exploits of their children or reporting on the kindly neighbor who died of cancer. #SunshineWeek
There is a crisis in local news in America. A jarring look here at what’s lost, and those trying to keep their communities informed.
"... many Americans no longer have someone watching the city council for them, chronicling the soccer exploits of their children or reporting on the kindly neighbor who died of cancer. "Local journalism is dying in plain sight."
BAD FOR DEMOCRACY: More than 1,400 cities & towns across the U.S. lost a newspaper over the past 15 years, according to an analysis of data. And the number of newsroom employees dropped 45% nationwide between 2004 & 2017, per .
Missouri man angrily stops subscribing to newspaper because it reports on a drag show at local community center. Newspaper folds. Now, he says, “I miss the newspaper ...candidly, for the most part, I’m ignorant.”
‘It felt like an old friend died.’ Waynesville, Missouri, is one of more than 1,400 U.S. cities and towns to have lost a newspaper in the past 15 years. #SunshineWeek
Town by town, local journalism is dying in plain sight
“Many Americans no longer have someone watching the city council for them, chronicling the soccer exploits of their children or reporting on the kindly neighbor who died of cancer. Local journalism is dying in plain sight.” Via ⁦
1/ This ⁦⁩ story about the demise of a small town newspapers — as told through the story of one paper in Missouri — shows in devastating detail why newspapers are important.
Waynesville, Missouri, became a statistic when its newspaper shut down. Now, Darrell Todd Maurina’s posts to Facebook are the main source of news in the town. #SunshineWeek Read the story:
“While national outlets worry about a president who calls the press an enemy of the people, many Americans no longer have someone watching the city council for them ...” The last line tho is the kicker.
Grim story on the agonizing death of local news — and how a mixture of ignorance, advertisements and amateurs are filling the gap.
What happens when a community loses its newspaper?
“Losing a newspaper is like losing the heartbeat of a town.” On the decline of local journalism—and what that means for communities across the country.
what is happening to journalism and newspapers should alarm us all. So many people now are getting information strictly from sources that already confirm what they believe aka Confirmation Bias. good piece h/t
“Maurina, who posts his work to Facebook, is the only person who has come to the Pulaski County courthouse to tell residents what their commissioners are up to”
Town by town, local journalism is dying in plain sight (from )
Philanthropists, please pay attention
Town by town, local #journalism is dying in plain sight via
"We are developing an America where people have no idea what their elected officials are doing." Decline in readers, ads leads hundreds of newspapers to fold -- and threatens community cohesion and local accountability.
Residents of >1,400 U.S. cities and towns lost a newspaper during the past 15 years.
How American towns lose a sense of themselves when their newspapers die