The problem isn't . It's our collective inability to ignore Twitter. But there's a simple way to limit the damage: We all finally need to understand that Twitter is not representative of America—and delete the damn app off our phones. [Thread.]
"To decision makers who spend most of their days ensconced in an elite bubble, Twitter can seem like a way out, a clear window into pure public opinion. In reality, it’s an extreme distortion." --
Crisp summary of the data concerning Twitter's dramatically unrepresentative character and the perils of mistaking the echo chamber for the world
This piece offers a great summary of research exploring how social media may be amplifying the voices of a loud, hyper-partisan minority -- including some of my own work with on this subject
I don’t agree with everything in this essay, but I did make this exact adjustment to my Twitter usage a few weeks ago and cannot recommend it enough. You will not miss the app.
Good stuff from Gonna try to adopt a similar approach to this awful awful invention
So let’s start solving the real problem with Twitter—its outsized influence on American life—right now. Delete the app from your phone. And then encourage your friends to do the same by (yup, I’m fully aware of the irony) retweeting this thread. [End.]
"The Problem Isn’t Twitter. It’s That You Care About Twitter"
Much of the argument of this timely essay should be obvious to us. Amazing that so many believe that Twitter is the world
I'm using my saved-up Irony Shield card to post this philippic against caring about Twitter, on Twitter while insisting you care about it. Forget quitting: you're not. But you can downrank its importance. By .
"If elected representatives treat Twitter as representative of public opinion, they will fail to be responsive to the actual views of their constituents"
Via : For those "who spend most of their days ensconced in an elite bubble, Twitter can seem like a way out, a clear window into pure public opinion. In reality, it’s an extreme distortion."
Twitter, where angry people go to find new things to be angry about
"What’s dangerous to democracy is not the existence of a forum in which extremists can talk to, and shout at, one another," argues . "It’s the possibility that decision makers will confuse the forum for the real world."
"Though many websites favor information that is true over information that is false, the web itself—a series of paths and pipes for raw data—was designed to be indifferent to veracity."
"The Problem Isn’t Twitter. It’s That You Care About Twitter."
"What’s dangerous to democracy is not the existence of a forum in which extremists can talk to, and shout at, one another—it’s the possibility that decision makers will confuse the forum for the real world."
The Problem Isn’t Twitter. It’s That You Care About Twitter. 2/2
"The outsize influence that small, unrepresentative groups now exert via Twitter is a particular source of concern."