People who deactivated Facebook in a study were happier afterward, reporting higher levels of life satisfaction and lower levels of depression and anxiety. That change is equal to about 25-40% of the beneficial effect typically reported for psychotherapy
People who deactivated Facebook in a study were happier afterward, reporting higher levels of life satisfaction and lower levels of depression and anxiety. That change is equal to about 25-40% of the beneficial effect typically reported for psychotherapy
Obtaining what we want makes us happy, right? Not as often as you might think, writes via
People who deactivated Facebook in a study were happier afterward, reporting higher levels of life satisfaction and lower levels of anxiety. That change is equal to about 25-40% of the beneficial effect typically reported for psychotherapy via
People who deactivated Facebook in a study were happier afterward, reporting higher levels of life satisfaction and lower levels of depression and anxiety. That change is equal to about 25-40% of the beneficial effect typically reported for psychotherapy
Obtaining what we want makes us happy, right? Not as often as you might think, writes vía
The economic principle that getting what we want increases our happiness turns to be less than ironclad writes via
What you want is not identical with what makes you happy. Though the article doesn't mention it, the scary thing is that as technology for delivering what you want becomes more refined, the two may *increasingly* diverge.
Obtaining what we want makes us happy, right? Not as often as you might think, writes
“Should be addressed” at the end seems like a euphemism for something but I can’t quite place my finger on it...