This is the deepest dive I’ve read on the dire financial state of the news industry - even its digital side. It shows that local journalism is dying fast. The only clear survivors: the ⁦⁩, the ⁦⁩, & the ⁦⁦⁩.
Everyone knows the newspaper industry is screwed. But it’s even more screwed than you think.
In stories about the decline of *newspapers*, I always want to know about and whether other models fill the *news need* and here is and it is depressing. “Openings of online-only news sites haven’t made up for flood of newspaper closures.”
"There has been a very significant outpouring of national support for local journalism, philanthropically, in the last year or two, but there has been very little local support for local journalism," says , prez of .
Chilling prediction: “It’s hard to see a future where newspapers persist,” said Nicco Mele, director of the Harvard’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, who predicts that half of the surviving newspapers will be gone by 2021.
This WSJ piece on the demise of local news is SO well done. And so devastating.
This is what I like to call the “barbell effect” —if you’re a big national or international brand you are probably going to be fine, and lots of small, hyper local publishers are surviving. In between is the Valley of Death
This is an excellent overview of the troubled state of the news industry. At the ⁦, under new local ownership, we’re proud that digital subscriptions have risen to 161,000, the most of any regional newspaper in the United States.
This WSJ analysis by et al of the economic collapse of local news is urgently important. We need philanthropic reinvestment across America. Glad to be part of and working alongside others on solutions.
Kudos to the for this stellar work. A WSJ examination of the newspaper industry found a widening gap between local outlets, which are in danger of vanishing, and the stronger national players via
An excellent, fact-intensive survey of the decline of the newspaper industry, especially locally, out today from ⁦
Newspapers “talked about paywalls for years, but didn’t get serious about them until recently, by which point staff cutbacks had made it hard to put out a product people would pay for” Via ⁦⁩ et al
In News Industry, a Stark Divide Between Haves and Have-Nots ....the bottom line in this excellent ⁦⁩ piece is that you need a civic sustainable fix for local reporting
👉 “Executives at some outlets.... talked about paywalls for years, but didn’t truly get serious about them until recently, by which point staff cutbacks had made it hard to put out a product people would pay for.” via
The U.S. has seen 1800 newspapers go out of business since 2004. That means hundreds of communities are uninformed about everything from local education and transportation issues to what’s happening at city hall. ⁦
A very thorough and fascinating examination by found the gap is widening between local news outlets, which are in danger of vanishing, and select national players that are on stronger footing via
Read this article and then please consider subscribing to the LA Times and/ or your local newspaper. We're rebuilding, but we need paid subscribers to continue producing impactful, compelling content. via
When “crisis” is the right word: “Nearly 1,800 newspapers closed between 2004 and 2018, leaving 200 counties with no newspaper and roughly half the counties in the country with only one, according to a University of North Carolina study.”
A WSJ examination of the newspaper industry found the gap is widening between local outlets, which are in danger of vanishing, and select national players that are on stronger footing
Maybe news isn’t an industry?
“It’s hard to see a future where newspapers persist,” said Nicco Mele, director of Harvard’s - #Journalism
The graphs in this article are brutal. “In News Industry, a Stark Divide Between Haves and Have-Nots”