"What message does it send…when civilians loudly call for the pardon of men and women who were punished for disobeying the laws and other orders their commanders ordered them to follow? What other orders, upon civilian review, are optional?”
I haven’t written much lately, but I’ve been thinking about this one for a while now.
“Thousands of soldiers have successfully led combat units without committing atrocities. Pardoning war crimes dishonors them.”
“Thousands of soldiers have successfully led combat units without committing atrocities. Pardoning war crimes dishonors them.”
The president pardoned an officer convicted of war crimes last week. That pardon "dishonors the thousands of men and women who successfully led combat units in Iraq and Afghanistan ... without committing crimes and other atrocities," argues
The president pardoned an officer convicted of war crimes last week. That pardon "dishonors the thousands of men and women who successfully led combat units in Iraq and Afghanistan ... without committing crimes and other atrocities," argues
"Thousands of soldiers have successfully led combat units without committing atrocities. Pardoning war crimes dishonors them." with important piece on the perils of political interference into military justice system
“If Americans aren’t going to bother to study their military, the least they can do is to abstain from projecting their vengeful fever dreams upon its professionals,” argues .
"I was 23 years of age, not even two years removed from a college classroom, when I was first thrown into combat and told, more or less, to kill the right people and to make sure my men did the same." You should read this, from
A good day to re-up this piece
Important article re: recent Trump pardon. The rationale for holding people to account for torture and other war crimes.