"These are dark times for liberal values of critical inquiry, reason and science. The magazine has given vent to an entirely worthless conspiracy theory without checking its provenance or veracity."
The hoary conspiracy theory that Shakespeare’s works were written by someone other than a jobbing actor from Stratford has been reprised in . I explain in why this farrago should never have been published & ought to be withdrawn.
“There are a mere handful of academics who give this stuff even the time of day, let alone credence, & Winkler has misrepresented the state of scholarship by insinuating that they are one side in a scholarly dispute,” writes .
“There is no decorous way of saying that Winkler’s article is a farrago that should never have been conceived, pitched, commissioned, or published.”
Why you can't trust mainstream media anymore
Very fine piece on Shakespeare and the conspiracy theorists who claim he was someone else by ⁦⁩.
Conspiracism at the Atlantic | by
“There is no decorous way of saying that Winkler’s article is a farrago that should never have been conceived, pitched, commissioned, or published,” writes .
fantastic & definitive piece at by absolutely demolishes 's bizarre Atlantic essay suggesting Shakespeare's work was written by a woman named Emilia Bassano. It turns out Winkler's sources include flying-saucer crackpots
A nice response by to the absurd Atlantic article claiming Shakespeare was a woman: via . But the best response to Shakespeare deniers is surely the great Richmal Crompton's "William Holds the Stage":
I didn’t know, but I shouldn’t have been surprised to learn, that Shakespeare conspiracy theorists are more often than not conspiracy theorists about other subjects, too. From , in devastating form
Awaiting response from on this dreadful error of judgment. My subscription renewal depends on whether or not they do the right thing and retract
In fact, has the last word in , demolishing this drivel with a meticulous and elegant summary.