Let's normalize parenting at work. My latest in the
If you are a senior employee who has kids, and especially if you are a senior male employee who has kids, you should be talking openly and honestly about your parenting obligations at work.
“Fight the (work) culture that encourages secret #parenting by not parenting secretly. Eventually, your colleagues will adapt.” My take - I've never hidden my kids or apologized for them & here’s why: I don’t do anything halfway, including parenting. 🤷🏻‍♀️
I wear my constant child-care crises on my sleeve. I’m lucky to work for people who know that as a mom of complex kids (no other kind), I bring an important perspective to my coverage. My work always gets done. Can’t separate the parent from the person.
Well, I will never forget Martha Nussbaum berating me during a job interview because I had the audacity to mention that I wouldn't attend evening lectures bc of my small children. "months of leave, the child disappears into a void," says .
As usual, nails it. This is why I'm SO INCREDIBLY VOCAL about being a parent: it's important to me to use my privilege and power to shed light on child care issues Oh and let's all collectively stop having events between 5 and 7pm thanks
“What happens after paid leave is nearly as crucial—that is to say, what happens when Mom and Dad return to the office. We need to normalize the experience of parenting while working.”
So grateful for great workplaces and great bosses for helping normalize parenthood in the workplace.
"The general sense is that everyone should adopt the polite fiction that after the first several months of leave, the child disappears into a void," says . "Fight the culture that encourages secret parenting by … not parenting secretly."
This article is spot-on - parents should be open about the fact that they are parents in the workplace without fear of being sidetracked professionally. It starts at the top. I bring my kids to the office sometimes.
Once had a senior woman at work tell me, as if it were assumed, that you could never say you had to leave the office because of your kid. Swore I would never do that to women coming up behind me. To Normalize Parenthood in the Workplace, Don't Hide It
This is a terrific piece - if we want to change our work culture to be more family-friendly, parents in leadership positions should model what that looks like
"The general sense is that everyone should adopt the polite fiction that after the first several months of leave, the child disappears into a void," says . "Fight the culture that encourages secret parenting by … not parenting secretly."
I talk about my kids at work all the time; when I need to leave early for them I say so. I understand that not everyone has the freedom to do this, but those who do should help normalize it
“But perhaps the answer is just as clear: Fight the culture that encourages secret parenting by … not parenting secretly. Eventually, your colleagues will adapt.”
This this this: "We need to normalize the experience of parenting while working."
And then do you expect to make the same money those of us who stay till 6 or 7pm do? “Sorry, but today I’m leaving at 3:30 since I’ve been traveling a lot and I promised my kids I’d come home early to make cookies.”
To Normalize Parenthood in the Workplace, Don't Hide It - The Atlantic
Worth a read. I’ve made the decision to talk about my kids at work. Their pictures are up. I brought one to meetings last week when childcare fell through.
"Fight the culture that encourages secret parenting by … not parenting secretly. Eventually, your colleagues will adapt." YES. Anyone who follows me knows that I do not secret parent. I would love if others (especially men) helped make that the norm
One of the best things I've seen this year is 's adorable daughter's face on my screen during a meeting
"Some of the women ... reported that they had feigned illness when their child got sick, since taking a sick day for themselves seemed acceptable, but taking one to nurse a child did not."
Even as the CEO of my company, I still feel guilty leaving the office ~5pm 3x/week to spend time w/ my kids. We can all do better.
Oh good, another article I can file under "More ways sexism would go away if only women would act differently"
How do we make the workforce more parent friendly?
Talking openly about child-care obligations is an important first step in creating new, more inclusive, workplace norms.
To normalize parenthood in the workplace, don't hide it
My children may be my most demanding "clients" but I knew I could work for when I could name school pick-up outright & not have to claim a recurring 3:30pm mtg. Grateful to h/t via
“Nor can women, even senior women, change the tenor of their workplaces alone. Men have to do it also. Parenting is not a mom-only activity.”
"One woman told me she worked on a team of men, all of whom were fathers. Pregnant with her first child, she noted that none of the men ever talked about their children, and she assumed she shouldn’t either." An important piece from
For moms and dads alike, talking about your kids at work can make a real difference, creating a culture of more flexibility, support and understanding for other parents.
I wish I had seen this article before I did my Q&A for ⁦⁩ yesterday - great data to support my advice to deliberately make small talk with dads in the office about kid-related things to normalize it. e.g., "What's she into now?"
Only after we halt the genocide of headline-hyperbole.
I agree that we should make kids visible at work. But policy is a more effective way to shift workplace culture. If EVERYONE got parental leave or could take off to care for sick kids (as in Sweden), it would change how we talk about kids in the workplace.
I can never be accused of being a "secret parent." I talk about my daughters all the time and have Isabella's artwork displayed literally everywhere!
Love love love this article on ending “secret parenting” from .
Yeah. I agree with all of this. Hiding parental responsibilities makes work so much more stressful. I talk about my kids illnesses all the time. They have a lot of them. cc
“Once parents start acknowledging their child-care obligations openly, the need for specific changes may become apparent.” for on the need to normalize parenting at work. #paidleave
To Normalize Parenthood in the Workplace, Don't Hide It - The Atlantic
In an attempt to do less #secretparenting I’ll let you all know that I just gave birth and that I am busy with baby snuggling for the foreseeable future.