Today, The Atlantic published a piece I have been working on for a long time, about one of the most powerful stories of our time: The decimation of Christianity in the Middle East. This is tragic, on its face. But it's also devastating for democracy. 1/x
This is a story that everyone--Christians, Americans, foreign-policy wonks, lovers of democracy--should know about. I hope you will read my story about the impossible future of Christians in the Middle East. 8/x
Many of the most important stories—and the hardest to cover—don’t break overnight. They’re tragedies that unfold over decades, without due attention. In this gripping story, takes you inside Iraq’s disappearing Christian community
Since 2003, more than a million people-80 percent of the Christian population-have left. The story is replayed across the region: Christians & other minorities are being pushed out of their homelands by governments that don't care about pluralism. 6/x
I traveled to the Nineveh Plain in Iraq, a strip of land that is the focus of epic bible stories and tense geopolitical wrangling. I met a family there that embodies the impossible struggle that Christians face in staying in the region. 2/x
An ancient faith is disappearing from the lands in which it first took root. At stake is not just a religious community, but the fate of pluralism in the region. reports
An important piece from at about the great Mideastern cultural extinction (an earlier chapter of which removed the region's Jewish communities and shaped Israel's population)
Sobering read. “Whether Christians can survive, and thrive, in Muslim-majority countries is a crucial indicator of whether democracy, too, is viable in those places.”
This is not the first time a historic group has been squeezed out of the ME. The Christians I met in Iraq repeatedly reminded me that Jews, too, once lived in this land. Some are fighting to stay. They also know a sustainable future seems impossible. 7/x
Before the American invasion, as many as 1.4 million Christians lived in Iraq. Today, fewer than 250,000 remain—an 80 percent drop in less than two decades. reports
"Under Obama, advocates howled that Democrats were refusing to take in persecuted Christians, but the number of Christians admitted from Iraq has dropped by 98 percent over the past two years."
"According to data from the U.S. State Department and the charity World Relief, only 23 Iraqi Christians were admitted to the United States in 2018, compared with nearly 2,000 in 2016. Families still in Iraq now look to Europe and Australia instead."
If you thought was an amazing reporter before reading this piece, after reading it you'll be stunned to learn that she is even better. Just take a look at this product of month of reporting overseas. It is long, but totally worth the read.
An important article from on the existential threat to Christianity in the Middle East.
“The precarious state of Christianity in Iraq is tragic on its own terms,” writes . “But the fate of Christianity in places like the Nineveh Plain has a geopolitical significance as well.”
An ancient faith is disappearing from the lands in which it first took root. At stake is not just a religious community, but the fate of pluralism in the region. reports
An ancient faith is disappearing from the lands in which it first took root. At stake is not just a religious community, but the fate of pluralism in the region. reports
Fascinating piece on the relationship between a faith and its homeland, and whether Christianity can survive in the region where it first took root.
"The graph of [Christianity's] decline in the Middle East has in recent years transformed from a steady downward slope into a cliff." reports from Iraq on the impossible future of Christians in the Middle East
My thoughts on this article (I thank and 's friendship as (partial) inspiration 😀)
The impossible future for Christians in the Middle East. ...One of the stories of our time but one that rarely gets told. ...in a majestic piece of journalism, makes some serious amends...
More great journalism on threats to religion, this one on Mideast Christians, from , whom I had the pleasure of sharing a panel with last night. We disagree on many things, but she's just a tremendous reporter.
., reporting from Iraq, on the future of Middle East Christianity
"An ancient faith is disappearing from the lands in which it first took root. At stake is not just a religious community, but the fate of pluralism in the region." If you haven't read 's blockbuster story on Iraqi Christians, make time for it
The Impossible Future of Christians in the Middle East