My Latest: “Like many rich Americans, I used to think better schools could heal the country’s ills,” writes , “but I was wrong.”
“I was wrong...[E]ducationism is tragically misguided. American workers are struggling in large part because they are underpaid—and they are underpaid because 40 years of trickle-down policies have rigged the economy in favor of wealthy people like me.”
This is worth a read: a thought-provoking reminder that education reform isn’t a cure-all. As a supporter of education reform, I agree that fixing educational inequality requires doing more to address the broader, systemic sources of economic inequality.
“Educationism appeals to the wealthy and powerful because it tells us what we want to hear: that we can help restore shared prosperity without sharing our wealth or power.” A powerful piece by .
"Educationalism" is actually far worse than this because it blames the poor for their poverty by cementing the myth anyone can get ahead with enough smarts & hard work. So if you don't you deserve it. It is an ugly myth that gives the wealthy a moral out
2. Here’s a great piece by in which he makes the case against ‘educationism’: the belief that better schools will fix all our problems. This is a fallacy.
“American workers are struggling in large part because they are underpaid—and they are underpaid because 40 years of trickle-down policies have rigged the economy in favor of wealthy people like me.” There has been little to no wage growth since 2000
“Like many rich Americans, I used to think better schools could heal the country’s ills,” writes , “but I was wrong.”
Excellent piece by on "educationalism," which is the concept that we must address inequality through 'better schools.' As Hanauer points out, educationalism is really about ignoring the misuse of power by the wealthy.
“Like many rich Americans, I used to think better schools could heal the country’s ills,” writes , “but I was wrong.”
Well, is one of those people who is always interesting. One of the tough things about covering education is that while research shows schools are a modest lever to close macro inequality gaps, they are transformative in individual lives
I feel like this thesis makes the rounds every couple of years, but is anyone in fact saying that improving education is the only important thing to do? (Well, it’s not)
Better schools won’t fix America. Like many rich Americans, I used to think educational investment could heal the country’s ills—but I was wrong. Fighting inequality must come first
Nick Hanauer is completely correct: Education is good but it cannot fix most of America's economic problems.
I think is right about "educationism" -- the belief that fixing education is the best way to improve society. Problems are much deeper; solutions more costly. [I would just add more emphasis on marriage and family stability]
Seems like the word "immigration" should have appeared somewhere in this piece on growing inequality by
"I used to have stupid, thoughtless ideas about how great education is. Now I have the same stupid, thoughtless ideas, but about household income."
Better education creates opportunity for individuals, but if we don’t reduce income inequality, the status quo persists. Education is not a panacea. To fight economic inequality, we don’t just need to give more. We need to take less. #ThursdayThoughts
"Long ago, I was captivated by a seductively intuitive idea: both poverty and rising inequality are largely consequences of America’s failing education system. Fix that and we could cure much of what ails America... I was wrong."
“We must invest not only in our children, but in their families and communities”
Elite consensus that better education is the solution to inequality gets shredded by former charter school advocate : “Income inequality has exploded not because of our country’s educational failings but despite its educational progress.”
Better Public Schools Won’t Fix Income Inequality - The Atlantic
“If we really want to give every American child an honest and equal opportunity to succeed, we must do much more than extend a ladder of opportunity—we must also narrow the distance between the ladder’s rungs.” Amen.
Wealth inequality is a disease and it’s killing this country.
“American workers are struggling in large part because they are underpaid—and they are underpaid because 40 years of trickle-down policies rigged the economy in favor of wealthy people...” #jobs #economy #education
Not when the typical White HS dropout has more wealth than the typical Black college graduate. #RacialWealthGap
Well, at least he got the title right. Also, compare The Atlantic content 1971 to now. 1971, actual science. 2019, muh inequality.
SAVE/GET KEY TWEET: Word missing from this article on $$ inequality. Begins with "i." ....
It's not "all about education"
“If we really want to give every American child an honest and equal opportunity to succeed, we must do much more than extend a ladder of opportunity...We must invest not only in our children, but in their families and their communities.”
"Educationism appeals to the wealthy and powerful because it tells us what we want to hear: that we can help restore shared prosperity without sharing our wealth or power."
Not often you read something that causes a complete paradigm shift in your thinking. This is humbling. “The opportunity to attend a good public school isn’t nearly enough to overcome the effects of limited family income”
Imagine what schools could accomplish if we didn't hold them single-handedly responsible for fixing social inequality. Oh wait, we already do that. But only for affluent, predominantly white schools.
You will like my latest piece in Atlantic.
Key subtext of 's mea culpa: Unaccountable philanthropists who are shaping often-questionable ed policies based on a belief in unfettered markets (incl'g anti-unionism)-- the very ideologies that contrib 2 income inequality, econ instability etc.
"Educationism appeals to the wealthy and powerful because it tells us what we want to hear: that we can help restore shared prosperity without sharing our wealth or power."
"Even the most thoughtful and well-intentioned school-reform program can’t improve educational outcomes if it ignores the single greatest driver of student achievement: household income."
“Like many rich Americans, I used to think better schools could heal the country’s ills,” writes , “but I was wrong.”
Such a powerful argument that no amount of effort put into education reform is enough if we don't first address economic inequality. Especially powerful coming from a philanthropist who used to believe the opposite.
"We have confused a symptom—educational inequality—with the underlying disease: economic inequality." (see also )
Philanthropist has changed his mind about "educationism" - the idea that better schools will help rebuild the middle class #philanthropy
Better Public Schools Won’t Fix Income Inequality - Inequality Undermines School Quality
Nick Hanauer rethinks educationism. Educational inequality is not the cause of, but rather a symptom of, economic inequality.
..“Like many rich Americans, I used to think better schools could heal the country’s ills,” writes , “but I was wrong.”
WOOP WOOP WOOP alert WOOP WOOP WOOP
(FWIW, Hanauer is the guy who five years ago was warning us about pitchforks. He was right, sort of, but it wasn't pitchforks we got; it was Trump.)
I found 's article on education and income inequality very thought-provoking, definitely worth a read
"We should do everything we can to improve our public schools. But our education system can’t compensate for the ways our economic system is failing Americans.” - via
“As America’s public-school systems foundered, so did the earning power of the American middle class. And as inequality increased, so did political polarization, cynicism, and anger, threatening to undermine American democracy itself.”
.“Like many rich Americans, I used to think better schools could heal the country’s ills,” writes , “but I was wrong.”