All this aside: The best story ideas don't come from press releases. They come from scientists, just chit-chatting about what they find exciting / interesting
Nice article by covering our recent research (led by & team) in which we experimented on press releases before they were issued to see if we could improve the quality of science news
A great questions for journalists to ask when they interview scientists: "What are the wrong conclusions to draw from this study?" #scicomm via
Calling out researchers and universities for their share in more accurate science news: "more accurate press releases don’t receive less coverage, but the coverage they do receive tends to be more accurate."
overhyped science findings in media coverage often originate in university press releases
"As a science journalist, I’ve really appreciated it when academics have gone above and beyond to try to communicate tricky findings to the public." —
This is really important. Overhyped press releases cause a huge amount of scientific confusion -- one of the culprits I note in my book How to combat overhyped science news via
Overhyped science? “scientists often don’t have incentives to make sure their work is well communicated in the press. But perhaps that should change.” Indeed it should. Scientists must pay more attention to the aspects under their influence.
"In my interviews with researchers, I try to ask a version of the question: “What are the wrong conclusions to draw from this study?” Press releases... could do better to include similar disclaimers in plain language." ⁦
The difference between what scientists report in the studies and what journalists report in their articles can look like a game of broken telephone.  Motivating researchers to communicate directly can fight back!
"[a new study] finds evidence that when university press releases are made clearer, more accurate, and free of hype, science news reported by journalists gets better as well." via
"As a science journalist, I’ve really appreciated it when academics have gone above and beyond to try to communicate tricky findings to the public." Thanks for caring about getting the story right! (And thx for talking to #LeshnerFellows.)
Science is often poorly communicated. Researchers can fight back. - Vox
Hyped-up science erodes trust. Here’s how researchers can fight back. via
Universities and institutions need to be careful to avoid hype when sharing a press release about their research, argues of :
How to combat overhyped science news via
Interesting article on how science is miscommunicated & misinterpreted, including a reference to how my Neural Predictors of Purchases paper (w/ et al) eventually came to be understood as showing that "shopping is as good as sex"
Two science journalists that I think do a good job of presenting nuanced science:
Hyped-up science erodes trust. Here’s how researchers can fight back. via
Hype, and a media that is not always attuned to the nuances of academic publishing, can distort the public’s view of new research. Scientists can counter this through effective communication and engaging with both the media and its consumers. v
Yet another reason to train scientists how to write for or otherwise communicate with the public. We know the nuance. We just need to know how to express it in ways that don’t cause eyes to glaze over.....
To me, the conclusions in the press release are not justified by the underlying research. I am reminded of 's work showing that exaggeration in media coverage of science can often be traced to press releases
Big problem leading to lots of stupid takes. But it does keep us debunkers- looking at you, Young63 - busy. "Overhyped science news" via
Hyped-up science erodes trust. Here’s how researchers can fight back. via