Curious as to why many people seem to be drifting further towards political extremes? The new book by explains why extremism is often the natural result of group deliberation
"The problem with conformity is that it deprives a society of the information it desperately needs...the dissenter challenges the status quo, introducing new ideas that may aid his group by improving an ailing system."
The fact that ⁦⁩ has empty bookshelf space in his office goes against everything I know about my friend!
Conformity: The Power of Social Influences—A Review by and via Very cool to see a quote from my book kicking off this excellent piece!
"For Sunstein, deliberation among the likeminded creates an ideological echo chamber where moderately held beliefs become dogma. To this extent, Sunstein notes that groups act as affect multipliers," write & .
"When group members drift in a certain direction, individual members will double down on that perspective to show their commitment. This drives the group towards extremism despite individuals not being extremists themselves."
"When group members drift in a certain direction, individual members will double down on that perspective to show their commitment. This drives the group towards extremism despite individuals not being extremists themselves"
“This is the conformity paradox. The more you care about the people in your group, the stronger the social incentive to be dishonest with them.” My review of ’s new book for with
Book review - Conformity: The Power of Social Influences, by Cass Sunstein: | Nice review of an interesting book, though what is called flaw I might more charitably call collateral damage
“ If people are unaware of an alternative viewpoint or too scared to share it, then orthodoxy cannot be dislodged.” Conformity: The Power of Social Influences—Review of terrific new book by ⁦my colleague ⁩ - Quillette
The lessons on conformity + dissent highlighted in Cass Sunstein's book, Conformity: The Power of Social Influences, is an accurate portrayal of the daily challenges of navigating scientific controversies
Generous and sharp review of my new book, Conformity, in
For related ideas, check out my latest for : “This is the conformity paradox. The more you care about the people in your group, the stronger the social incentive to be dishonest with them.”
"The more you care about the people in your group, the stronger the social incentive to be dishonest with them."