“Every single word they said was from my book. Then I got to the end of a nearly 10-minute segment and did not hear myself credited at all.” An exclusive from
Tenured, white, male, well-resourced historians argue they're engaging in an "accepted practice" of "distilling" scholarship when withholding credit to a junior scholar. Read Sara Ahmed on citation as feminist practice. Correct citation builds your field.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov. They have tenure. She does not.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov.
What it's like for #WomenInAcademia: A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov. They have tenure. She does not.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name.
The more I think about this and listen to other (women) professors talk about it the more convinced I am we should call it what it is: plagiarism
Her name is Sarah Milov.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR, before it was published, to talk about it (they received an advance copy). They had tenure; she did not. They never mentioned her name. Via ⁦
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov. - The Lily
This is some BS. Sorry, A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. - The Lily
If you want the "back story" <groan> to this thread, you can read up on it here.
The best would be if sales take off now.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov. - The Lily
The three men on the segment, two historians and an NPR host, never mentioned Milov’s name or the name of her book
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov.
Have you ever heard your own book mansplained on the radio? has. NPR still hasn't credited her for the content.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov.
Cool beans Nice super casual misogyny A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov.
"“It’s unfortunate that we didn’t acknowledge the author who was largely responsible for much of the content,” said Sam Fleming, managing director of news and programming at WBUR." 🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name.
Wow. Like every other woman in academia, I can’t even imagine this happening. 😒🙄😤
Another example of a female academic not being credited for her work: A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov.
A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. - The Lily
Ugh. Although an NPR discussion drew almost entirely on a forthcoming book by a woman historian, Sarah Milov, the guests -- two men historians -- never mentioned her name. Why didn't NPR interview her instead?
“A female historian wrote a book. Two male historians went on NPR to talk about it. They never mentioned her name. It’s Sarah Milov.”
This story raises some important questions about how we use the tools of blogs and podcasts. They are great for sharing research findings widely but can be a challenge to insert proper citations in these formats. We must be diligent.