When I was at Yale, a lot of the scandals never made sense to me. The "free speech" narrative was not enough to explain all the problems, or what happened to , so I wrote up a framework to explain it.
Excellent essay by -- well captures a lot of my own bewilderment in my journey from community college to the Ivy League, with elites trying very hard to deny that they are elite -- and sometimes convincing themselves
This was an insightful, very long read by . Rings true. There’s a leadership problem across the elite academic institutions supposed to be training leaders. Makes me admire more what Robert Zimmer has done at .
Couldn’t stop reading this fascinating article by ⁦⁩ “Real Problem At Yale Is Not Free Speech” Palladium Magazine
This only describes a fraction of the phenomenon of foreign students at the top of their race and class hierarchies cynically playing ideological games and LARPing as oppressed POC at U.S. universities. They'll tell you this openly after two drinks.
This is a fascinating long-form piece on the culture at Yale. The author writes: “I had to stay up-to-date with the latest PhD-level critical theory just to have conversations.” I was riveted by this snapshot of the cultural moment we find ourselves in.
The campus “free speech” debate is just a side-effect. So are debates about “diversity” and “inclusion.” The real problems run much deeper. The real problems start with the masks we wear for each other.
This is a long essay. I recommend starting with the section "Abandoning the Ship of State," and that should motivate you to read the rest of it.
A really excellent long read on how the political crisis of 'woke' campus politics is rooted in good part in a deeper malaise afflicting American elites. It describes a kind of class consciousness that would have been totally foreign to me in college.
"What you end up with is not an establishment where a woke upper class rallies & advocates for the rights of underprivileged groups. What you have is a blind & self-righteous upper class that becomes structurally unable to take coordinated responsibility."
"Poor people pretend to be rich to look cool. Rich people pretend to be poor to fit in...The students mocked him—not for being poor, but for being too rich...I had no idea that these kids were even richer than the boy they were mocking."
"When they misunderstand both the nature of power and their own power, how can they be expected to coordinate to use that power to rule well? How can they be expected not to abuse it?" Very interesting essay on elite dysfunction by Natalia Dashan.
The woke class is the new leisure class
"But what was the point of it all?" Wow. Excellent article by . Puts the finger on the spot. Actually, on many 'covered up by performance' spots. Uncomfortable read for some, maybe. As it *should* be.
“Let’s take down the Man. They say this in front of their PowerPoints. They clink champagne glasses. Let’s take down the Man! But there is no real spirit of revolution in these words. It is a performative spectacle about their own morale and guilt.”
Watching the upper echelon of the US elites at top colleges, nonprofits, media, and heck the president of the united states all portray themselves as victims over the past five years has been a heck of an experience, not sure there's an analogue in history
Very interesting attempt to grapple with toxic wokeism. Don't agree with every word but the class element is CRUCIAL and often gets ignored -- opportunistically, because things lose their SJ punch when you realize how much this is about wealthy people.
This diagnosis of elite culture reads straight out of a post- "Western elites are not comfortable with their place in society and the responsibilities that come with it, and realize that there are deep structural problems..." 1/2
This article on what’s wrong with Yale by and, by extension, the young adults of America’s ruling class, is a bit long and meandering. But it contains flashes of real brilliance — worth persevering with
F A S C I N A T I N G The Real Problem At Yale Is Not Free Speech | Palladium Magazine
"You want to be absolved of your power. You are ashamed of your power ... You would rather be somebody normal. But not, “normal,” normal. ... Or you want to be something even better than normal. You want to be the underdog ..." via
“...the conventional standards of elite morality, based on responsible use of power—actually responsible, not just a convenient feeling of doing good—are much harder...” Ht
A landmark article in Baizuo anthropology by
This author probably could have made these points in about one tenth the space. I I suspect her piece would have been much stronger had she chosen to do so.