The share of Republicans who say presidents could operate more effectively if they did not have to worry so much about Congress and the courts increased 16 percentage points over the past year, from 27% in March 2018 to 43% this past July.
Currently, 45% of the U.S. public has a favorable opinion of the Republican Party, while 52% view the GOP unfavorably. Opinions about the Democratic Party are the same (45% favorable, 52% unfavorable).
In our July survey, a growing share of Republicans said the nation's problems could be dealt with more effectively if U.S. presidents "didn’t have to worry so much about Congress or the courts."
In July, 82% of Democrats and 51% of Republicans said it would be too risky to give U.S. presidents more power.
Republicans are now more open to the idea of expanding presidential power
Serious jump in Republican support for the idea of expanding presidential power in new survey. Still, 66% of overall public says "it would be too risky to give U.S. presidents more power to deal with many of the country's problems."
Almost half of Republicans (43%) endorsing giving more power to the President instead of Congress and the courts - compares to 29% for Dems under Obama
When a political party thinks this way, the separation of powers is fundamentally ruptured and will not recover overnight. GOP electeds already think this; but worse, it's where the GOP rank and file is headed, and it won't be stopping anytime soon: /9
This Week in Situational Ethics: Republicans Now Are More Open to the Idea of Expanding Presidential Power - (a 3x increase since '16)
In just 17 months, "conservatives" went from 70%-26% opposed to expanding presidential power (allowing the president to bypass "Congress or the courts”) to 52%-41% in favor. Most self-identified "conservatives" aren't conservative. They're authoritarian.