Over the span of just 14 years, between 1950 to 1964, black farmers in Mississippi lost almost 800,000 acres of land. When translated into today's economic value, this is a loss of between $3.7 billion to $6.6 billion. Read this story by .
1/ In our latest cover story, investigates the war waged by deed of title that dispossessed black agricultural landowners of millions of acres.
should be said, again and again, that the case for reparations doesn’t actually rest on slavery
Farmers of color have experienced a long history of discrimination. From 1910 to 1997, Black farmers were stripped of 90% of their land—a staggering loss and a major contribution to the racial wealth gap.
“Something on the order of 6 million acres was lost by black farmers from 1950 to 1969. That’s an average of 820 acres a day—an area the size of New York’s Central Park erased with each sunset.” ’s new cover story, out today, by
This incredible story is relevant to other farming communities as well. Japanese American incarceration during WWII was egged on by white Californians jealous of JA farmers' productivity and market share. Farms were stolen or sold for pennies.
Since the 1950s, a war waged by deed of title has dispossessed black agricultural landowners of millions of acres, reports.
"A war waged by deed of title has dispossessed 98 percent of black agricultural landowners in America. They have lost 12 million acres over the past century." An urgent new cover story from
And perhaps you've heard about 's new cover story on how farms were taken from black families. Some research for that piece was provided by Kirwan director and UMass professor ; both will also join the panel.
How TIAA owns a chunk of Mississippi Delta farmland stolen from its African American owners, among 1 million African Americans separated from their land.
Just an incredible story from on how, with the aid of the federal government, black farmers were systematically displaced from their land using legal and extralegal means
Between 1950 and 1964, black farmers lost 800,000 acres of land in Mississippi and by 1969, 6 million acres nationally — a loss of $3.7 billion to $6.6 billion in today’s dollars. A must-read from on the taking of black-owned farmland.
New today: 's September cover story is Vann R. Newkirk II's () report on the shameful story of how nearly 1 million black farmers were robbed of their livelihood.
“An upheaval of this scale and speed—the destruction of black farming, an occupation that had defined the African American experience—might in any other context be described as a revolution or historical fulcrum. But it came and went with little remark.”
Less than five years ago, Vann and I started a little website called Seven Scribes. Today he published his first cover story at The Atlantic. Proud is an understatement.
THIS was exactly why the South fought Reconstruction! "But money does not define every dimension of land theft. Were it not for dispossession, Mississippi today might well be a majority-black state, with a radically different political destiny."
In living memory, millions of acres of American farmland were owned by black farmers. Read on how 98 percent of them have lost—or been robbed of—their land.
"What happened to black landowners in the South, and particularly in the Delta, is distinct, and was propelled not only by economic change but also by white racism and local white power" Important piece from is out today. Please read it.
This is one of the stories was born to write. Not just worth your time—it fairly demands it.
Vann Newkirk investigates how a million black families were robbed of their farmland. 's latest cover story
Legal and coercive dispossession. "A war waged by deed of title has dispossessed 98 percent of black agricultural landowners in America...the losses mostly occurred within living memory, from the 1950s onward."
Wow- this should be essential reading for anyone associated with, or studying, agriculture in the US. Since the 1950s, a war waged by deed of title has dispossessed black agricultural landowners of millions of acres, reports.
Politico's Playbook recommends 's new cover story as a great afternoon read, and I do too
It strikes me how much of this occurred during my own lifetime. The effects of racism are not confined to the past, we are very much living with them today.
Then we're going to read this article by on the dispossession of black landowners, who've lost 12 mill acres over the past century. From the article: "This was a silent and devastating catastrophe, one created and maintained by federal policy."
The Mississippi Delta’s History of Black Land Theft
The systematic dispossession of black land owners in the U.S. post-1950.
Seems a comparative historical/contemporary analysis of land grabs in the West and in the Global South remains to be written. If interested/know anyone who might be, tell me/tag & share. The Mississippi Delta’s History of Black Land Theft - The Atlantic
Since the 1950s, a war waged by deed of title has dispossessed black agricultural landowners of millions of acres, reports.