Our article covered in the NY Times States with expensive childcare are boxing mothers out of employment. Individual families can't out earn the rising costs of childcare - state governments need to help and
Why has there been a revived debate about whether women should work? Because public child care is on the U.S. political agenda -- & that's always brought up strong feelings about the proper role of women (and which women, & who gets to decide)
In the 19th century, white mothers were only supposed to work if their husband was one of the four Ds, said -- dead, divorced, drunk or disabled. Black women, however, were always expected to work.
"In the United States, the resistance to public child care has never been mainly about economics. It has been rooted in a moral argument." via
Excellent piece on how American ambivalence about working mothers stalls progress on the very policies that would help families stretched to the breaking point by ⁦ via ⁦
"In the United States, the resistance to public child care has never been mainly about economics. It has been rooted in a moral argument — that the proper place for mothers is at home with their children."
Great piece on childcare in the US by ⁦⁩, featuring sociologists ⁦⁩ ⁦
Today, in states with very expensive child care & short school days, like California, fewer women work. In states with more affordable care & longer school days, like Nebraska, a much larger share of women work, found
More cheery news from the domestic trenches! Why the U.S. Has Long Resisted Universal Child Care
Sociologists Leah Ruppanner, University of Melbourne; Stephanie Moller, UNC Charlotte; and Liana Sayer, University of Maryland research on the relationship between affordable child care and women's employment outcomes highlighted in today's
So many of our policies are based on outdated assumptions—especially those about families. In two-thirds American families, both parents work. We must make childcare more affordable and accessible.
Why does the US resist universal childcare?
Why the US Has Long Resisted Universal Child Care: "child care is still viewed symbolically not economically. Discussions are around the sanctity of motherhood, preserving the traditional family. Women are living very different lives from that"
Why the U.S. Has Long Resisted Universal #ChildCare, by via #sdoh
Why Has the U.S. Long Resisted Universal Child Care? Here’s a big reason: “Just 18 percent of Americans told Pew that it’s best if both parents work full time, and nearly half said one parent should stay home.” ⁦⁩ ⁦
Why the U.S. Has Long Resisted Universal Child Care
Featuring work showing high child care costs depress mother's employment by #poweredbyIPUMS Why the U.S. Has Long Resisted Universal Child Care
Much of 's oped about American ambivalence about child care is on point, but it's weird to claim that many women don't work because they can't afford to; rather, most work because they can't afford not to.
This gets it backwards. The pro-family right has always been a popular scapegoat for the failure of universal childcare proposals but the evidence I’ve seen points to their cost as the factor that kills them each and every time.
Important article on childcare politics from .