Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, and Yale have more students in the top 1% of family income than in the bottom 60%. Elite schools are reinforcing inequality, not meritocracy. It's long past time to open more doors to those with less. #SaturdayThoughts
Meritocracy has made life an endless, terrible competition, writes Daniel Markovits. The system is no longer serving anyone well.
This piece and the related book are a huge big deal. We are living through the end state (or perfection) of something with roots centuries ago. “Each man for himself in that desert of egoism which is called life” (Stendhal, The Red and the Black).
The meritocracy is making us all miserable.
Don't hate the player, hate the game. (Or rather, don't hate the fact that some people have genetically-influenced embodied characteristics that are selected for when life becomes "an endless terrible competition". Hate the competition.)
There’s big-time buzz about “The Meritocracy Trap,” a book out next month by Yale Law professor Daniel Markovits. So pleased to have this adaptation in The Atlantic.
Meritocracy is just aristocracy without the burden of noblesse oblige.
It is remarkable that in our society the dominant class has created such a shitty, menial and pathological life even for its own offspring. The modern aristocracy is a bunch of provincial and anxious petty bourgeois. (from )
Always worth remembering when anyone drops the “H bomb” (or equivalent): “Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, & Yale collectively enroll more students from households in the top 1 percent of the income distribution than from households in the bottom 60 percent”
"it is simply not possible to get rich off your own human capital without exploiting yourself and impoverishing your inner life"
"Hardworking outsiders no longer enjoy genuine opportunity."
Don't cry for meritocratic elites; but they are the peacocks in the coal mine: their misery highlights why a society of market-exposed "human capital" competition is bad for everyone & needs structural reform to life up good work & lives:
‘Our version of meritocracy destroys opportunity for the many, and destroys quality of life for the few who succeed.’ Brilliant piece by
"Meritocracy has created a competition that, even when everyone plays by the rules, only the rich can win." Read this article carefully. It really matters.
A classic example of backward reasoning: "On average, children whose parents make more than $200,000 a year score about 250 points higher on the SAT than children whose parents make $40,000 to $60,000."
Absolute economic mobility is also declining—the odds that a middle-class child will outearn his parents have fallen by more than half since mid-century. Meritocracy frames this exclusion as a failure to measure up, adding a moral insult to economic injury
Best piece I read while I was away: How life became an endless, terrible competition (and why today's self-sustaining elite might be even worse than previous self-sustaining elites)
"Escaping the meritocracy trap will not be easy. Elites naturally resist policies that threaten to undermine their advantages." Markovits extract
Very thoughtful article on the challenges of meritocracy by Daniel Markovits in . Recommend also reading ' "Twilight of The Elites," which was published in 2012 and very prescient.
How Life Became an Endless, Terrible Competition, according to Daniel Markovits. That's why it's about time to get rid of the term 'human capital' and replace it with 'human capability.' #inequality
How the meritocratic ideal privileges the elites and exacerbates social inequality
Based on this excerpt, seems to me that Markovits is not so much arguing against meritocracy as saying that our system has failed to create a true meritocracy -- and that those competing risk losing themselves in it.
This provocative article is reminiscent to me of work about Dream Hoarders. Here, though, another curious concept. Is there work hoarding? -- it leaves us with an idea to ponder. Is there an opportunity to reconsider distribution of work?
"But because meritocratic inequality does not in fact serve anyone well, escaping meritocracy’s trap would benefit virtually everyone."
One of the types most likely to write this sort of article is a prof safely ensconced at an Ivy. "In practice, however, meritocracy now excludes everyone outside of a narrow elite." No. Just ask any successful entrepreneur or investor.
I agree with much of this essay but it’s striking that entrepreneurship is not part of the author’s prescription for an equitable society. We need to put starting a business back at the center of the American Dream and make it available for everyone.
Very intersting! Meritocracy seems to be built on the shoulders of privilege. And what that entails... Meritocracy Harms Everyone - ⁦
"Building a society in which a good edu & jobs are available to a broader swath of people—so that reaching the very highest rungs of the ladder is simply less important—is the only way to ease the strains that now drive the elite to cling to their status."
"Whereas aristocrats once considered themselves a leisure class, meritocrats work with unprecedented intensity." "But it is simply not possible to get rich off your own human capital without exploiting yourself and impoverishing your inner life"
Meritocracy stinks. Please read my colleague Daniel Markovits’s article and buy his powerful new book
Meritocracy prizes achievement above all else, making everyone—even the rich—miserable. Maybe there’s a way out.
Meritocracy Harms Everyone - The Atlantic
A good description of the trap, but not so strong on the solutions
"Building a society in which a good education and good jobs are available to a broader swath of people...is the only way to ease the strains that now drive the elite to cling to their status."
America's cruel faux-meritocracy makes everyone miserable, even the "winners."
"Meritocracy traps entire generations inside demeaning fears and inauthentic ambitions: always hungry but never finding, or even knowing, the right food."
How Life Became an Endless, Terrible Competition
Meritocracy is a fair competition in which the rich, win.
"Private schools and universities should lose their tax-exempt status unless at least half of their students come from families in the bottom two-thirds of the income distribution."
Interesting piece with a bold suggestion: 👀 "Private schools and universities should lose their tax-exempt status unless at least half of their students come from families in the bottom two-thirds of the income distribution."
High time preference. False meritocracy. University certification elites. Low economic mobility. Bitcoin solves that.
How Life Became an Endless, Terrible Competition Meritocracy prizes achievement above all else, making everyone—even the rich—miserable. Maybe there’s a way out. (H/t )
Here's my objection to articles like these. It's not just that the author exemplifies the patrician state he decries, but he clearly relies on said position and pedigree to dictate/influence policy and perspective.
Huh. So maybe it's not just the cellphones, then?
Here's how the general structural-demographic process of intra-elite competition is playing out today in the US.
Related to my thread from last week: “Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, and Yale collectively enroll more students from households in the top 1 percent of the income distribution than from households in the bottom 60 percent.”
A great idea with no chance of happening: "Private schools and universities should lose their tax-exempt status unless at least half of their students come from families in the bottom two-thirds of the income distribution." #philanthropy
3/ The same institutional arrangements that ostensibly benefit the wealthy, Markovits argues, have actually made their lives quite miserable. An excerpt appears in the September issue of THE ATLANTIC:
Have to say I'm a bit skeptical that school got so much harder and more stressful than it was in the past. Maybe student resiliency has simply declined.
'Harvard, Princeton, Stanford & Yale collectively enroll more students from households in the top 1% of income distribution than from households in the bottom 60%.' Interesting piece on how life became an endless competition
Meritocracy is killing us.
Btw this is circulating today and is very a propos: the rat race is hurting everyone, but in different ways