Another example of how campus speech culture is moving in to the corporate world: Safetyism backed by mindless bureaucratic enforcement. Expect innovation and cooperation to decrease. From Walter Mosley.
"I’d been in the new room for a few weeks when I got the call from Human Resources. A pleasant-sounding young man said, 'Mr. Mosley, it has been reported that you used the N-word in the writers’ room.' I replied, 'I am the N-word in the writers’ room.'"
Walter Mosley: Why I Quit the Writers’ Room. As a psycholinguist I’d add: It’s absurd to grant words the magical power to harm merely by being uttered, even in quotes. Words are conventions, not causal forces.
amazing how few people will acknowledge that the most enthusiastic language policing and cancelling is coming from a VERY small subset of overeducated, disproportionately white progressives. all the evidence points that way. this is anecdotal but still
Censorship doesn’t change minds—at least, not in the way the censors want. Censorship entrenches opinions, hides beliefs and biases in deep recesses, where they can fester. We change each other best through dialogue, not diktat.
In Opinion Walter Mosley writes, "The worst thing you can do to citizens of a democratic nation is to silence them. And the easiest way to silence a woman or a man is to threaten his or her livelihood."
Walter Mosley quits ST:Discovery. "I got the call from human resources. A pleasant-sounding young man said, 'Mr. Mosley, it has been reported that you used the n-word in the writers’ room,'" Mosley said."I replied, 'I am the N-word in the writers’ room.'"
Mr. Mosley, it has been reported that you used the N-word in the writers’ room.” I replied, “I am the N-word in the writers’ room.” Why I Quit the Writers’ Room
Powerful: “If I say a word that makes somebody uncomfortable... The worst thing you can do to citizens of a democratic nation is to silence them. And the easiest way to silence a woman or a man is to threaten his or her livelihood.”
“I got the call from Human Resources. A pleasant-sounding young man said, ‘Mr. Mosley, it has been reported that you used the N-word in the writers’ room.’” “I replied, ‘I am the N-word in the writers’ room.’”
Why I Quit the Writers’ Room ”There I was, a black man in America who shares with millions of others the history of racism... If addressed at all that history had to be rendered in words my employers regarded as acceptable.”
If this HR rep didn't think he was going to end up the hapless villain of a Walter Mosley dispatch for telling him he wasn't allowed to use the N-word in a writers room, even in the context of discussing his own personal experience, that's on him.
Hollywood’s insufferable wokescolding, which has now been embedded in corporate culture, is biting its own artists
BREAKING: inadvertently publishes an interesting column! "I do not believe that it should be the object of our political culture to silence those things said that make some people uncomfortable."
We live in the dumbest fucking timeline.
A story of political correctness as a tool of oppression, told by someone empowered enough to do something about it.
"The worst thing you can do to citizens of a democratic nation is to silence them. And the easiest way to silence a woman or a man is to threaten his or her livelihood."
‘A pleasant-sounding young man said, “Mr. Mosley, it has been reported that you used the N-word in the writers’ room.” I replied, “I am the N-word in the writers’ room.”’
"I was in a writers’ room trying to be creative while at the same time being surveilled by unknown critics who would snitch on me to a disembodied voice over the phone. My every word would be scrutinized. ..."
This from the great Walter Mosley is quite something
Walter Mosley on being snitched on by writer colleagues. Amazing.
Great piece on how political correctness can backfire, by making it hard for minorities to write about their own experiences.
Amazing. Working for a TV show, Walter Mosley gets called by HR: “It has been reported that you used the N-word in the writers’ room.” I replied, “I am the N-word in the writers’ room.” He said, very nicely, I could not use that word except in a script.
This is appalling, but I take heart from the fact that each great person who gets cancelled helps reduce the meaningfulness of getting cancelled
Why I Quit the Writers’ Room - “I do not believe that it should be the object of our political culture to silence those things said that make some people uncomfortable.” Powerful story. I agree, and hope you do to.
"There I was being chastised for criticizing the word that oppressed me and mine for centuries." Read this -->
Heed the words of Walter Mosley, one of America's most honored fiction writers: "How can I exercise these freedoms when my place of employment tells me that my job is on the line if I say a word that makes somebody, an unknown person, uncomfortable?"
Black Star Trek writer tells a story of a cop's racism in the writer's room, ends up in a meeting with HR for using the N-word
An important piece about democracy & speech. Students & faculty tried to silence me & threaten my livelihood too. ⁦⁩ did not forcefully respond and protect speech. We need to do better; too much is at stake Why I Quit the Writers’ Room
On trying to be creative while being surveilled by a new “McCarthyism of condemnation”
Why I Quit the Writers’ Room
Why I Quit the Writers’ Room
Why I Quit the Writers’ Room
This makes me sputter in disbelief — Opinion | Why I Quit the Writers’ Room - The New York Times
Who the fuck snitched on Walter Mosley? WALTER MOSLEY?
"Let’s not accept the McCarthyism of secret condemnation." Walter Mosley - Why I Quit The Writer's Room
The culture of #woke and the culture of #safespaces reaching absurd levels. Walter Mosely cannot use the n-word in the writers room.
“I was in a writers’ room trying to be creative while at the same time being surveilled by unknown critics who would snitch on me to a disembodied voice over the phone. My every word would be scrutinized. Sooner or later I’d be fired or worse — silenced.”
Why I Quit the Writers’ Room
"But if you tell me that you feel uncomfortable at some word I utter, let me say this: There was a time in America when so-called white people were uncomfortable to have a black person sitting next to them."
RT from everybody, first
"if someone has that flag in their mind, I’d prefer to see it on their front porch too."
Agree wholeheartedly with this piece by (and I hope I'm tagging the right guy). But we can't be selective in applying this sentiment. We must safeguard the right to make everyone uncomfortable, esp. today's "snowflake" constituencies.