Colleges with high SAT scores—which are the highest-ranked, with the lowest acceptance rates & largest endowments—admit very few low-income students and very few black and Latino students. This article changed my mind on testing, wealth & admissions.
Impt deep dive by in ⁦⁩. Would’ve also loved to hear insights from sociologists e.g., ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ Tina Wildhagen at ⁦⁦⁩ & Megan Holland at ⁦
“In public, university leaders like to advertise the diversity of their freshman classes and their institutions’ generosity with financial aid. In private, they feel immense pressure to maintain tuition revenue and protect their school’s elite status.”
Summary: The reason elite universities continue to admit mostly rich students is the hackability of the SAT (in the sense that SAT prep classes can get you higher scores).
The Paul Tough essay on why college admissions are biased against the low-income is excellent. This is not a problem that boils down to One Simple Thing. At my count, it's at least five things.
American colleges collectively now give more aid to each student with a family income over $100,000, on average, than they do to each student with a family income under $20,000.
American colleges collectively now give more aid to each student with a family income over $100,000, on average, than they do to each student with a family income under $20,000.
Like everything Paul Tough writes, this blew my mind
This is a good piece on enrollment management. "Admissions for us is not a matter of turning down students we’d like to admit. It’s a matter of admitting students we’d like to turn down."
This NYT article about how college admissions are biased in favor of lazy white boys with inflated test scores and against amazing Women of Color with high GPAs is an example of Occam's Butterknife, as I point out here:
superbly rich reporting on how admissions works in the context of a selective/elite institution that is nonetheless dependent on the revenue rich kids bring in. makes you wonder what, say, HYP's excuse is for their student bodies looking the way they do.
Having the work of the community & my personal story featured in the is an honor. Thank you for telling this important #HigherEd story. I hope it inspires #students & #colleges to live up to their fullest potential.
"The dictates of financial-aid optimization and the algorithms of modern enrollment management have made the process of college admissions more opaque and unbalanced than ever." in today's
This story about the many reasons why elite schools stay full of wealthier but worse students was extremely eye-opening
Its really worth reading this article by to get a sense of why certain colleges dont have more of a positive effect on social mobility in the U.S.
Brilliant reporting on how the gears of higher ed continue to advantage the privileged—despite much fanfare about diverse student bodies & need blind admissions. ⁦⁩ masterfully pieces together how it works (and doesn’t!).
Thread: By now, if you work in higher ed, you've almost certainly seen this NY Times article by Even though I'm in it, I think it's really good.
Great piece on college admission analytics, challenge of financing classes w more first-gen, poorer kids
Outstanding reportage and explanatory journalism. "What College Admissions Offices Really Want."
Great piece on how overrepresentation of wealthy students is baked into budgets of most selective colleges, and the challenges of admissions given the $ constraints. by
Very interesting analysis of what's wrong with college admissions policies. What College Admissions Offices Really Want
Read alongside this great piece by , showing the degree to which even rich colleges that talk a lot about equity overwhelmingly favor wealthy kids (partly because they want the tuition $$, & partly b/c ‘elite’ = rich)
Moneyball for college admissions —> Enlightening ⁦⁩ piece + profile of the amazing ⁦⁩ 👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽
“Enrollment managers know there is no shortage of deserving low-income students applying to good colleges. They know this because they regularly reject them — not because they don’t want to admit these students, but because they can’t afford to.”
“Maybe — just maybe — the term ‘elite’ means ‘uncluttered by poor people,’ ” Boeckenstedt wrote. “And maybe that’s the problem?” Powerful reporting by on how college admissions reproduce inequality.
Read alongside this great piece by , showing the degree to which even rich colleges that talk a lot about equity overwhelmingly favor wealthy kids (partly because they want the tuition $$, & partly b/c ‘elite’ = rich)
What College Admissions Offices Really Want
Great report on big #highered issue + how ⁦⁩ under ⁦⁩ is leading change, w ⁦⁩ ‘What College Admissions Offices Really Want’ ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ ⁦
“The rise of predictive analytics in admissions and financial aid has had the effect of automating and turbocharging the pressures that enrollment managers have always felt...” #EMchat #HigherEd #FinAid
Not once, not ever, have I claimed that inequality in higher ed is a demand side problem. I sure wish the key role that savvy dissenters have played- and the pushback we have given to College Board etc- was evidenced in here. #RealCollege
Fascinating article on college admissions that makes me want a viable counter balance to the US News college rankings.
Quite possibly the most insightful article about college admissions that I’ve read. Highlights the contradiction of an irrational system built on rational decisions