This is a fascinating piece, about how tiny decisions made for no particular reason — turning left instead of right, sleeping in, etc — made the difference between life and death on 9/11
Poignant piece on the role of luck in life, makes you appreciate both luck and life more: On September 11, Blind Luck Decided Who Lived or Died. Via ⁦
Even 18 years later, shudders at the sheer randomness of 9/11: Move an 8 a.m. meeting to 8:45 because of a game on TV the previous night, and you lived. Do a favor for a coworker, and you lived. But make the wrong turn into the hallway...
Outstanding piece. For me, it was a neighbor (⁦’s mother)⁩ who offered to drive our daughter to school that morning. Otherwise I would’ve been exiting the WTC subway stop just as the first plane hit
When you think you have read everything there is to be read about the day, this piece is so moving
"One thousand times a day, we all make arbitrary decisions—which flight to book, which elevator to board, whether to run an errand or stop for coffee before work—never realizing the possibilities that an alternate choice might have meant."
"These mundane choices, travel schedules, and breaks in routine that dictated whether someone lived or died on 9/11 belie the structure and order we try so hard to give to our lives," writes .
I put off reading this excellent piece by because, well, reading about 9/11 is hard. But so necessary. The piece is a poignant reminder of the day & how much #randomness matters -- in politics, business, and, ultimately, life.
“On September 11, Blind Luck Decided Who Lived or Died,” by ⁦
"These mundane choices, travel schedules, and breaks in routine that dictated whether someone lived or died on 9/11 belie the structure and order we try so hard to give to our lives," writes .
Missing a typo, changing your shirt, and turning left out of a meeting seem like trivial decisions. But they saved lives on 9/11. Remembering how random choices affect your life can make you more grateful for it. #SaturdayMotivation
On 9/11, Luck Meant Everything
There but for the grace of Fate go I. If only more people applied this insight more widely.