Not only are red and blue America experiencing two different economies, but those economies are diverging fast and in real time. 1/
In just 10 yrs the two parties have gone from near-parity on prosperity and income measures to stark divergence. Median household incomes in Dem districts have soared, from $54K in 2008 to $61K in 2018. GOP districts have gone down from $55K to $53K. 3/
Dem-voting districts have seen their productivity climb from $118K per worker in 2008 to $139K in 2018. GOP-district productivity remains stuck at about $110K. 5/
Revealing map from : The House Dem majority in 2009 vs House Dem majority in 2019
Not only do red and blue America reflect different economies. Also they are diverging really fast | My new brief
Further political and economic sorting now also means that Democratic House districts skew much higher on real GDP than the GOP’s districts. Nice viz below. More from new brief here:
Rapid shifts in the geography and industry make-up of red and blue America have been transforming America's central economic-political dichotomy. Here are 9 changes in just 10 years:
Th fight between the parties is basically the fight between the economic past and the economic future.
Not only are red and blue America experiencing two different economies, but those economies are diverging fast
Dem-voting districts have seen their productivity climb from $118K per worker in 2008 to $139K in 2018. GOP-district productivity remains stuck at about $110K.
“America has two economies—and they’re diverging fast” | My new brief w/
Thanks in part to further political sorting Democratic House districts are now significantly denser now on avg than they were in 2008 while GOP ones have gotten less dense on average. Another finding from new brief here:
In the 111th Congress in 2008, Dem-voting districts covered 39% of U.S. land area. By 2018’s 116th Congress, that land share dropped to 20%, further emphasizing the urbanizing of the party.
This is eye-opening: blue and red America are starting to look economically and demographically like western and eastern Germany...and vote that way, too.
“Democratic [House] districts have seen their median household income soar in a decade—from $54,000 in 2008 to $61,000 in 2018....Republican districts began slightly higher in 2008, but then declined from $55,000 to $53,000.” study
America has two economies—and they’re diverging fast
"In 2008, Democratic-voting...districts encompassed 39% of U.S. land area...By the 116th Congress, just ten years later, the Democratic share had fallen to 20% of the map."