Microbe that got man drunk could help explain common liver disease | Science | After he ate a meal high in sugar, his blood alcohol level rose to as high as 400 milligrams per deciliter. “That’s equivalent to 15 shots of 40% [80-proof] whisky,” wow!
The rare case of a man who becomes drunk after eating has led researchers to discover gut bacterium that could be an important driver of the world’s most common liver disease.
A man became so intoxicated that he blacked out—just from eating. What scientists found among his gut microbes could help explain a common liver disease.
“Microbe that got man drunk could help explain common liver disease“ 🍰🦠🥴 = 🍷🥴 story features perspective from Dr. AM Dhiel ⁦⁩ ⁦
Microbe that got man drunk could help explain common liver disease.
Alcohol-producing gut bacteria could cause liver damage even in people who don't drink Oh man, "That’s equivalent to 15 shots of 40% [80-proof] whisky." Blame your #microbiome for fatty liver #NAFLD #NASH