My first week I was told by an econ faculty member that economics wasn't for me. That didn't deter me. But, it speaks to the hostile environment Black women face in economics and policy. Thank you for this op-ed and
Important piece on the barriers facing African American women in the field of economics. ⁦⁩ Opinion | ‘It Was a Mistake for Me to Choose This Field’ - The New York Times
Based on the #AEAClimateReport, alum and I wrote about issues facing Black women in economics and current & potential efforts to address them (). Hope all will read the op-ed & climate study: . 1/N
Economics needs more black women. They are underrepresented in the profession, which is bad for everyone, write Lisa D. Cook and Anna Gifty Opoku-Agyeman.
Today ⁦⁩ and ⁦⁩ wrote a very sobering op-Ed about the problems black women face in the economics profession. Saying “women and minorities” can shroud the troubling experiences of black women Econs. We must do better.
“If economics is hostile to women, it is especially antagonistic to black women.” Important column from & .
Sobering but necessary op-ed today on the state of play for black women in economics from and !
Powerful argument by & Anna Gifty Opoku-Agyeman on the underrepresentation of black women in economics. This does not just hurt black women but impoverishes the discipline and the ideas/policies that come out of it, hurting all of us.
Last week had 2 stories. One on how few black female economists there are () & the other on taxes and income inequality that interviewed no people of color as experts on the economy (). AND OH BOY ARE THOSE THINGS RELATED.
Must-read by ⁦⁩ and ⁦⁩ on black women in economics. Some key issues: citations (lack thereof), student evals.⁦⁩, though annoying, is doing good work on this.
Important op-ed by two of the most important advocates for equality for black women in economics, and . Only 0.6% of PhDs and 2% of BAs in economics in the US were awarded to black women.
The great and in on the need for more diversity in economics and the countless barriers that have discouraged too many brilliant black women from becoming economists. These barriers rob all of us of their insights.
“I would not recommend my own (black) child to go into this field,” said a black female economist. “It was a mistake for me to choose this field. Had I known that it would be so toxic, I would not have."
“I would not recommend my own (black) child to go into this field,” said one of the black female respondents. “It was a mistake for me to choose this field. Had I known that it would be so toxic, I would not have.”
We recommend this important op-ed from and . Econs can do better.
"If economics is hostile to women, it is especially antagonistic to black women." Op Ed by two of the most inimitable advocates and economists in the profession (& two of the econs I admire most), and . Please do read.
“I would not recommend my own (black) child to go into this field,” said one of the black female respondents. “It was a mistake for me to choose this field. Had I known that it would be so toxic, I would not have.” Via ⁦⁩ #economics
Economics is neither a welcoming nor a supportive profession for women. But if economics is hostile to women, it is especially antagonistic to black women. By &
Fellow white male economists: if you are considering sharing a link to this op-ed by and while including a suggestion that some part of it be changed, I would encourage you to drop that suggestion and simply share the op-ed.
Economics is hostile to women, but it is especially antagonistic to black women, write Lisa D. Cook and Anna Gifty Opoku-Agyeman
Black women account for 6.8% of bachelor’s degrees in the social sciences. But in 2017, only 0.6 percent of doctoral degrees in economics and only 2 percent of bachelor’s degrees in economics were awarded to black women.
In a new op-ed, Equitable Growth Research Advisory Board member lays out how black women are underrepresented in economics and why that's bad for everyone. A must-read that lays out the barriers faced by black women and how to tackle them.
Powerful op-ed by & Anna Gifty Opoku-Agyeman on challenges faced by Black women economists: underrepresented, underencouraged (h/t to ), undercited, & poorly evaluated by students, among others. We must do better!
Great opinion piece in the on the need for more black women in economics by and Anna Gifty Opoku-Agyeman.
"lack of diversity among economists [is] a liability for the profession because it [leads] to a myopic sense of the most pressing problems and the most relevant solutions" (with apologies for my bracketed conjugations)
“Economics Needs More Black Women”
Must read post by and in on the hostility black women in economics experience and what can be done to address it.
Excuse me but and have said THE WORDS that #EconTwitter needs after the #AEAClimateSurvey. We’ve achieved acknowledgement as the first step. Now it’s time for institutions to roll up their sleeves and do the work.
Black women are underrepresented in economics, which is bad for everyone. Anna Opoku-Agyeman. Part of a more general problem of under-representation of disadvantaged groups in science
"If economics is hostile to women, it is especially antagonistic to black women." While Black women account for 6.8 percent of bachelor’s degrees in the social sciences. they were awarded 2% of bachelor's only 0.6% of doctoral degrees in economics.
‘It Was a Mistake for Me to Choose This Field’
Economists, please read.
Required reading on the situation facing black women in economics from two of the sharpest minds out there: the inimitable and the irreplacable
‘It Was a Mistake for Me to Choose This Field’
"A lack of diversity among economists [is] a liability for the profession...[leading] to a myopic sense of the most pressing problems and the most relevant solutions." Lisa Cook & Anna Gifty Opoku-Agyeman on Black women's underrepresentation in economics.
‘It Was a Mistake for Me to Choose This Field’