When should you start talking to your kids about race, religion and social class? At six months, experts say. In one study, infants as young as six months old showed a preference for members of their own race and against those of different races.
A new survey finds a majority of parents rarely, if ever, discuss ethnicity, gender, class or other identity categories with their kids. Researchers say that's a problem — because kids are hardwired to notice differences early on, and they ask questions.
Black parents are twice as likely as white parents to talk about race with their kids, according to one survey. "It's not the role ... of a group of parents to be having those conversations," says one expert. "It really is the responsibility of everyone."
Not talking about race doesn’t help anyone. Talk about race and identity with your children.
“‘Why is this person darker than me?’ ‘Why is this person wearing that hat on their head?’... many minority parents... have difficult conversations with their kids about identity that majority parents should also be having — but aren't.”