Jake Rosenfeld, Washington University in St. Louis sociologist, research on organized labor highlighted in article on labor activism and strong economies, in today's
It's simple: Corporate profits are soaring, but workers' salaries are barely budging. I'll strengthen the rights of workers to strike—because we should all see the benefits of a strong economy.
Why so many American workers are flexing their muscles and going on strike in the greatest wave of walkouts since the 1980s.
Sustainable economic prosperity will only occur when the rewards of growth are equally shared. The wealth divide is dangerous. "workers accepted austerity when the economy was in a free fall, expecting to share in the gains once the recovery .."
Because how we define “strong economy” is seriously flawed.
Back when unions were stronger, strike activity went up during economic booms. The link broke after decades of deunionization, when strikes all but vanished. But what's old may be new again, via
If the labor market's so damn good, then why on earth are so many workers striking?
“It’s about: ‘O.K., the government is not going to take care of us. Business is not going to take care of us. We’ve got to take care of ourselves.’”
In a Strong Economy, Why Are So Many Workers on Strike? Corporate profits are near a record high. “It’s about: ‘O.K., the government is not going to take care of us. Business is not going to take care of us. We’ve got to take care of ourselves’”
Why are so many workers on strike when the unemployment rate is so low? Partly it's because they have leverage. And partly it's...
That’s why in the days of yore there was a discipline called “political economy.” “Growth” and “distribution” are different issues, both before and after taxes.
When the pursuit of justice and decent pay are both blocked by the same employers... via
In a Strong Economy, Why Are So Many Workers on Strike?
3/ copper mines and smelters in Arizona and Texas went on strike, saying their members had not received raises for a decade." To repeat yesterday's news, the total wage increase won by the UAW amounts to less than 5 years of GM's CEO's salary.
Good piece, but the paradox identified in the headline is no paradox at all. Rather, it is precisely at moments when economic indicators are stronger that we should expect more strikes. The real question is why had this uptick taken so long?