Complaints about editorial power distract from the real problem: hypercompetition & the academic career structure - my article in 1/n
This article was inspired by a twitter thread of mine at the recent NAS meeting 2/n
My article on careers and editorial power is now in front of the registration wall
Best article I’ve read in a long time explaining why much of the proposed reform to scholarly publishing is the tail wagging the dog: Academics should stop fixating on the editorial power fallacy
This is an important take. There are many systemic problems with modern academia, but certainly professional journal editors are not the cause of the problem. Academics should stop fixating on the editorial power fallacy via
Don't blame editors for poor career structure, writes Richard Sever
Another good perspective
"grandees decry obsession with high-impact journals (despite publishing there themselves), failing to grasp realities that have supplanted rosy past they recall, in which journal-agnostic quality judgements were made and science was more gentleMANly."
#peerreview ‘A bolder and perhaps more necessary step would be to admit the fiction that a postdoc is a training position for group leadership and to create more permanent staff positions below principal investigator level.’ via
The article is brilliant, full of one-liner gems saying it like it is, I get the urge to quote-tweet every second paragraph. Would end up violating THE paywall, probably. Good job
"admit the fiction that a postdoc is a training position for group leadership"
"[fulltime] editors are highly trained professionals, and it’s debatable whether judgements of academic editors are any less subjective or biased." says . I would add that many of them are more careful than tenured side-gig editors.
it’s not that i’m worried about building something that bad; it’s more to emphasize that if we don't recognize/aren’t honest about the underlying causes (that lead to bad proxies) people may revert to other poor proxies - as i mention here 1/2
DEPRESSING but accurate "Academics should stop fixating on the editorial power fallacy" maintains the real issue is we train up way more PhDs than will ever get an academic job (a good, cheap way to get research done without tedious work contracts)
hmm…I suspect any funding criteria that deprive most people in an environment where most people are highly talented and would deserve funds if we had them will produce discontent 1/2
It’s also the reason the challenge faced by post-docs these days is not the same as that a few decades ago when the career structure was devised... 2/n
this relates to one of the warnings here that in (rightly) seeking to avoid judging people by journal name we must be careful the old boys network does not substitute 2/2
'Academics should stop fixating on the editorial power fallacy' Interesting and thought provoking article via #AcademicTwitter #ResearchCulture
"When scientific grandees decry the modern obsession with high-impact journals (despite publishing in the same titles themselves), they are failing to grasp the realities of the hypercompetitive environment that has supplanted the rosy past they recall."
Academics should stop fixating on the editorial power fallacy - a defence of editors and journals, and critique of institutional behaviour, by (paywalled )
"admit the fiction that a postdoc is a training position for group leadership and to create more permanent staff positions below principal investigator level." brings the 🔥in his piece for