Delighted to share our latest work, on ancient DNA of individuals from in and around Rome, spanning the last 12,000 years. At its peak Rome was the largest city of the ancient world with 1M inhabitants, controlling an empire of 70M people
So excited to share our paper on the genetic history of Rome! As Rome grew from a small city to an empire spanning Mare Nostrum (‘our sea’, as the Romans called the Mediterranean) the city became a mosaic of inhabitants from across the empire... 1/5
The trajectory of ancestry in Rome could be summarized as "there and back again".
All roads may lead to Rome, and in ancient times, a great many European genetic lineages did too, according to a new Science study. Its results are perhaps the most detailed analysis of changing genetic variation patterns in the region to date.
Few fields would be more fun to get into than ancient genomics.
New genetic paper seems to support Tacitus' account that in Nero's day a great many of Rome's senators and knights were descendants of slaves and that the native stock had dwindled to surprisingly small proportions.
Ancient #Rome was a melting pot - culturally and genetically! Genome #sequencing of #ancientDNA study shed light on #ancestry and shifts over time.
"127 genomes from 29 archaeological sites in and around Rome, spanning the past 12,000 years. We observe two major prehistoric ancestry transitions: one with the introduction of farming and another prior to the Iron Age"
Ancient Rome: A genetic crossroads of Europe and the Mediterranean
Rome wasn't built (or settled) in a day. A new Science study reveals a dynamic population history from the Mesolithic (~10,000 BCE) into modern times, and spanning the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. Read the research:
According to the just released study on ancient Roman DNA, the closest modern population to Imperial Romans are Cypriots. This map shows how the Mediterranean genetic continuum of today largely mirrors the Rome of the Imperial Age. #AncientRome #Cyprus
We all know the written history of Roman civ. With an awesome resource of DNA from 10k+ years and cutting-edge popgen analysis, , , , et al. articulate a new, genetics-based perspective of Roman history/pop migration patterns
Roman DNA - 127 ancient genomes from 29 archaeological sites in and around Rome spanning the past 12,000 years.
Ancient Rome: A genetic crossroads of Europe and the Mediterranean
'Gene flow' is my favorite euphemism.
tl;dr: Genetic data shows that ancient Rome's population makeup went through two major transitions, one with the introduction of farming, and a second likely driven by trade. Ancient Rome: A genetic crossroads of Europe and the Mediterranean
"Ancient Rome: A genetic crossroads of Europe and the Mediterranean" (population genetics, ancient DNA (aDNA))
Genetic diversity, reflecting Mediterranean, Europe, and North Africa origins. No genetic border walls. Ancient Rome: A genetic crossroads of Europe and the Mediterranean