Wages Rising: Bottom 25% of wage earners: Up 4.5% Top 25% of earners: Up 2.9% (in November from a year earlier, per Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta) via
The WSJ credits tight labor markets... let’s keep the momentum going and cut legal immigration, enforce Hire American/Buy American, and fight H-2b visa fraud.
One 2019 labor market trend you hope continues in 2020: stronger wage growth for lower-paid workers
#GoodNews “Wages for the typical worker—nonsupervisory employees who account for 82% of the workforce—are rising at the fastest rate in more than a decade.”
Rank-and-file workers are getting bigger raises than bosses, helped by short supply of labor, minimum-wage rises and increased poaching
Wages for the typical worker—nonsupervisory employees who account for 82% of the workforce—are rising at the fastest rate in more than a decade. Economic growth takes a long time to kick in for low-wage workers, but it does have big impact.
🚨🚨 “Wages for the typical worker—nonsupervisory employees who account for 82% of the workforce—are rising at the fastest rate in more than a decade...” 💥💥
The “rally” isn’t just benefitting the “top 25%.” “Pay for the bottom 25% of wage earners rose 4.5% from a year earlier” as of November. The acceleration dates back to early 2018. Coincidence?
“The going rate for a warehouse worker in Atlanta is close to $15 an hour, up from $12 two years ago”
Workers are Getting Bigger Raises in Percentage Terms this Year than Bosses - #FightingForYou
Wages for the typical worker—nonsupervisory employees who account for 82% of the workforce—are rising at the fastest rate in more than a decade
From 'Rank-and-File Workers Get Bigger Raises.'
Wages of the bottom 25% of earners rose 4.5% in November from a year earlier. Wages of the top 25% of earners rose 2.9%
If you think income inequality is a problem here's a little bit of good news: Wages for rank-and-file workers are rising at the quickest pace in more than a decade, even faster than for bosses
Wages for the typical worker—nonsupervisory employees who account for 82% of the workforce—are rising at the fastest rate in more than a decade.