"So should women blow their own trumpets harder? One recent paper rebuts that easy conclusion. In a study of economics research, women were subject to more comments from reviewers, and made to revise their submissions more." 1/3
Ladies: Get going talking more positively about your work! via
New from me: a novel, unique look at how men show off their work in academic titles and abstracts by using more positive self-describing words.
Male researchers were more likely to describe their work in positive terms, according to a recent study
A study examining the language of over 100,000 clinical-research articles found that men are more likely to promote their work
"Women were subject to more comments from reviewers, and made to revise their submissions more". It's a shame to see how many extra obstacles women have to face in their careers all the time. We need to do better.
Papers with male authors used the word "promising" 72.3% more than those written by women
Awkward. -> Significant gender differences in scientific article self-promotion. AND it's associated with more citations. "...Effects were bigger in prestigious journals." #womeninSTEM #science /1
Papers with male authors are more self-promoting via
"In trying to please stubborn reviewers, women seem to be making their abstracts simpler and more straightforward. Perhaps they are cutting extra words—like “promising”." 3/3
"Women’s “readability scores” (a measure rewarding short words and sentences) increased over subsequent drafts, and over subsequent papers across their careers, while men’s did not." 2/3