Studies Find Redlining Linked To More Heat, Fewer Trees In Cities Nationwide
Researchers looked at 108 urban areas across America. In nearly every city studied, the formerly redlined neighborhoods were hotter than the non-redlined neighborhoods — some by almost 13 degrees.
Our new study covered on - Studies Find Redlining Linked To More Heat, Fewer Trees In Cities Nationwide : NPR
Racism is a self-inflicted wound. Today, U.S. cities have less tree canopy to mitigate the severe impacts of urban heat and climate change because of discriminatory policy decisions made 90 years ago. In the end, racism hurts everyone. #Blindspot
New research links formerly Redlined neighborhoods with higher average temperatures due mainly to lack of trees. These neighborhoods also tend to be disproportionately poorer communities of color.
This study on urban heat islands uses maps to illustrate that the hottest neighborhoods are places that have long suffered from urban inequities.
Redlined neighborhoods are also hotter (some by as much as 13 degrees), so there’s the environmental justice angle along with the racial disparity in the wealth being built.
With the heat wave across large areas of USA, it’s important to realize poor and minority urban centers suffer even more as a result of the ways cities were developed including redlining. This excellent article discusses this issue
Today’s lab meeting, discussing this important work from et al. on the links between historical housing policies (redlining), canopy, and urban heat.
A1: Research shows historically red-lined parts of U.S. cities are warmer than counterparts. In a warming planet, these inequalities may increase. #PopEdChat
I saw present on his research a few months back. It is striking what a clear illustration it is of how racist redlining policies are continuing to marginalize communities. Must read for anyone who cares about #environmentaljustice.
Powerful and important research from and colleagues about the legacy of racist redlining practices from the 1930's: neighborhoods that get and stay hotter during #extremeheat events
Hey ! We just published a paper about shade, heat, and redlining. I’d love to tell you about it since you just aired an episode about this same topic!
Cool! and at win a covering urban heat disparities, including a piece on our recent paper about linking to present-day heat patterns in US cities: Congrats!
(In the US) Racist Housing Practices From The 1930s Linked To Hotter Neighborhoods Today
Racist Housing Practices From The 1930s Linked To Hotter Neighborhoods Today Maps shaded neighborhoods red deemed "hazardous" based on the number of AAs and immigrants. Segregationist policies concentrated poverty & stifled home ownership.