There's much to think about, and to disagree with, in 's provocative #longread about decadence But there is also a truly remarkable lacuna. It does not mention #climate.
"What if the meltdown at the Iowa caucuses, an antique system undone by pseudo-innovation and incompetence, was much more emblematic of our age than any great catastrophe or breakthrough?" asks in an essay adapted from his new book.
Will be thinking for a while about the last point here: That our screens have effectively papered over the ideological and political stagnation that surrounds us with a pleasing simulacrum of meaning and action.
"Take a single one of the great breakthroughs of the industrial age — planes and trains and automobiles, antibiotics and indoor plumbing — and it still looms larger in our everyday existence than all of the contributions of the tech revolution combined."
‘Complaining about decadence is a luxury good — a feature of societies where the mail is delivered, the crime rate is relatively low, & there is plenty of entertainment at your fingertips. Human beings can still live vigorously amid a general stagnation...’
Surprised I like this write-up of his new book so much. 4th to last para calls to mind Laudato Si of Pope Francis. There is hope.
Phenomenal piece by : The Age of Decadence - The New York Times
If only there were an app to fix this
Very interesting, very provocative: The Age of Decadence
Optimists insist we’re anxious because the world is changing faster than our primitive ape-brains can process. But what if the feeling of acceleration is an illusion, conjured by expectations of perpetual progress and exaggerated by the filter of internet?
Opinion | The Age of Decadence - The New York Times (h/t ⁦⁩)
Interesting column. There is a lot less "innovation" than the hype and money managers would have you believe.
The word I was looking for is "overwrought." Great word because it sounds like "overwritten," which is kind of what it means. And here is with an example:
I have my disagreements with the long book excerpt from in yesterday's paper, but he's on the mark in his assessment of campus placidity (and, to a lessor extent, political violence). NB
“Take a single one of the great breakthroughs of the industrial age — planes and trains and automobiles, antibiotics and indoor plumbing — and it still looms larger in our everyday existence than all of the contributions of the tech revolution combined.”
The Age of Decadence puts a broader context on our forthcoming AER paper "Are Ideas becoming harder to find"
Are we now living in an age of decadence in the West, analogous to the decaying final centuries of the Roman Empire? The Age of Decadence
The Age of Decadence