For the first time in the Pew survey's two-decade history, a majority of Americans said dealing with climate change should be a top priority for the president and Congress. But the partisan split is enormous.
Voters want action on climate change
For the first time in the Pew survey's two-decade history, a majority of Americans said dealing with climate change should be a top priority for the president and Congress. But the partisan split is huge.
First time in history: Most Americans now say climate change must be a top presidential priority, Pew finds. But what a partisan split. By
The 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗶𝘀𝗮𝗻 𝗴𝗮𝗽 on climate change is the most yawning in the survey’s history, and the largest among 18 issues.
"For the first time...a majority of Americans said dealing with climate change should be a top priority for the president and Congress."
"For the first time in the survey’s two-decade history, a majority of Americans said dealing with climate change should be a top priority ... But the surge in climate and environmental concern masks a deep partisan divide."
In the US, "climate change" has just overtaken "jobs" for the first time as something people want the president and Congress to treat as a "top priority"
For the first time in the Pew survey's two-decade history, a majority of Americans said dealing with climate change should be a top priority for the president and Congress. But the partisan split is huge.
“For the first time in the [Pew] survey’s two-decade history, a majority of Americans said dealing with climate change should be a top priority for the president and Congress. That’s a 14 percentage point rise from four years ago.”
More Americans than ever are saying climate change should be a priority for the president and congress. But the polling gap between Democrats and Republicans is wider on that issue than any other.
Public opinion on climate change is shifting; a majority of Americans want it to be a priority for lawmakers and the president. But there's a partisan split.
This new survey shows that, despite the partisan split, a majority of Americans want this issue to be a top priority, and the rise over time is remarkable.
For the first time, a majority of Americans said dealing with 𝗰𝗹𝗶𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗲 𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗻𝗴𝗲 should be a top priority for the president and Congress, according to a recent survey.
For the first time ever, a majority of Americans say climate change should be a top political priority. But it is also now the single most polarizing (by this measure) issue surveyed, with a bigger partisan gap even than guns or immigration.
Take on last weeks new Pew Poll showing Climate as a rising concern with voters, but mostly just Democratic Voters
Climate concern is at an all time high with Americans. But excuse me for just a moment. Terrorism is the TOP concern for GOP voters (with nothing else even close). Seriously?
We cannot tackle the most urgent issue facing the world if leaders of the other party continue to deny the problem exists.
The strong upswing in public concern about climate change—including among younger Republicans—is real, and important. We see it in our surveys too. ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ ⁦
The irony of course being that there can be no "economic growth" in a scenario of climate collapse...
Good news: For the first time more than 50% of Americans tell Pew that addressing climate change should be a top priority of government. Bad news: It is the most politically polarizing issue in their survey.
Climate Change Rises as a Public Priority. But It’s More Partisan Than Ever - via ⁦
good & bad news on #climatechange in USA by re data first, bad news: partisan divides continue now good news: US majority now say "dealing w/ climate change should be a top priority for the president & Congress"
Climate Change Rises as a Public Priority. But It’s More Partisan Than Ever.