Lots of coverage of this case study of symptomatic reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 after short period of time in US (). But when interpreting, worth remembering this advice from early in the pandemic:
Here's a collection of short pieces on topical #COVIDー19 issues Reporting this epidemic: Will summer extinguish COVID-19?
I wrote this piece with about how reporters can help cover the #Covid_19 pandemic better. It’s also targeted at the general public, to help understand the different sorts of knowledge we can talk about. Many thanks to for hosting!
Posting or retweeting about the #COVID19 coronavirus on twitter? You're playing a role of editor/reporter. and have written an excellent piece on how to responsibly communicate about the epidemic. It's a must-read.
My article with on how to report on #covid19 responsibly in
The article is a perfect example of doing what and I wrote in Feb. would cause trouble with COVID-19: conflating "x is possible" with "x is common." . Most would expect some reinfections: q is how often, how severe, how contagious?
Seek diverse sources of information. Slow down a little. Don't confuse events that can happen with events that happen often. Some good advice from and on #COVID19 reporting and interpretation of information.
But still, decisions need to be made. I get that. So what can decision makers expect from a good advisor in this setting of enormous uncertainty? Dialogue and honesty. I like how and think about it. 3/
Lots of wisdom in this February article from and . Tip #2: Slow down a little. "Facts that have lasted a few days are far more reliable than the latest “facts” that have just come out, which may be erroneous or unrepresentative."
The pace of new information is overwhelming, and some of the claims in this thread have shifted from speculative to factual or very nearly so. Other points need to be modified in light of new data. See article with on these categories
The coronavirus issue is sorting the wheat from the chaff when it comes to science & health reporting. Given so much pressure to be first, to get headlines and clicks, there is too much poor reporting. This is an excellent perspective
„Emergencies like this one lead to extreme pressure on both scientists and journalists to be the first with news. And there are perverse incentives arising from the attention economy we now inhabit.“ Well worth reading this by and
How to Report on the COVID-19 Outbreak Responsibly, also, how to inform yourself about if responsibly, specially if you are a scientist but not an epidemiologst. via
reporting should distinguish between at least 3 levels of information: (A) what we know is true; (B) what we think is true—(C) opinions and speculation. #journalism #COVID19 #coronavirus
La lettura di questo pezzo di su come parlare responsabilmente di #coronavirus sui media è facile e utile. Lui insegna epidemiologia a Harvard.
"Distinguish between whether something ever happens and whether it is happening at a frequency that matters." -this is a really nice point
"there are perverse incentives arising from the attention economy we now inhabit—exacerbated by social media—that may provide short-term rewards for those willing to accept lower standards" How to Report on the COVID-19 Outbreak Responsibly via
How to Report Responsibly on the #COVID19 Outbreak: Remember, the #coronavirus doesn’t follow the news and doesn’t care about Twitter, by via #journalism #scicomm
Emergencies like this one lead to extreme pressure to be first. There are perverse incentives arising from the attention economy. Read all of this post #COVID19 #coronavirus
How to Report on the COVID-19 Outbreak Responsibly: Remember, the virus doesn’t follow the news and doesn’t care about Twitter via &
Good advice for scientists and journalists from ‘The virus doesn’t follow the news and doesn’t care about Twitter’ #COVID19 to Report on the COVID-19 Outbreak Responsibly via
Reporting should distinguish between at least three levels of information: (A) what we know is true; (B) what we think is true—fact-based assessments that also depend on inference, extrapolation or educated interpretation; and (C) opinions and speculation
Excellent explainer on how to differentiate between facts & predictions vs opinions & speculation when reporting on #COVID19. Interesting to note that outbreaks "lead to extreme pressure ... to be the first with news" which exacerbates the "infodemic."
How to Report on the COVID-19 Outbreak Responsibly: Remember, the #coronavirus doesn’t follow the news and doesn’t care about Twitter via &