In a meta research twist, I'm incredibly excited to share my preprint about preprints on Twitter on Twitter (with )
Preprint usage by academics + non-academics. 2 things stand out: 1) Most tweets = curated, informed perspectives from experts. 2) Appeal of genetics to right wing contrasts with appeal of ecology/immunology to the left…
This project from and Kelley Harris is so important... they do an analysis of social media audiences for papers, capturing how certain topics are appropriated by white nationalist / far-right audiences
Quantifying and contextualizing the impact of bioRxiv preprints through social media audience segmentation #bioRxiv
Fascinating pre-print on social media dissemination of research papers. Lots of great stuff but the big thing for me is the major proportion of white nationalists tweeting papers 1/
Anti-racist preprint! Examines the Twitter *audience* for highly tweeted bioRxiv papers. Classifies Twitter authors not using their own biographies, but the bios of their followers. Clever modeling from :
Quantifying and contextualizing the impact of bioRxiv preprints through social media audience segmentation
Working with to study how scientists & the public engage with manuscripts has been one of the highlights of PI life thus far! We port over a STRUCTURE-like algorithm from genomics to illuminate an entirely different data space
Interesting study related to social media interest in various scientific studies. Among other things, it shows the trickle-down from genetic studies of things like IQ and EA to race “scientists,” and more overt racists and white nationalists.
This work in progress is a new application of the twitter audience classification framework that and I recently used to distinguish scientific discourse from different types of lay audience engagement with a wider variety of recent preprints