Next installment in the COVID chronicles from and me. On the absurdity of elevating "the economy" over society, and the dangers of a riptide pulling us backwards.
Grateful to and for writing this potent trilogy of political analyses for the human rights stakes of COVID-19 and what we can fight for now in the .
"Models of the economy, it turns out, do not incorporate the idea of staying home as productive of anything at all—not least avoidance of the negative externality of mass death." #coronavirus
More from my dear friend and me. 1/
Claims that the cure is worse than the disease rely on a false tradeoff between human needs and the economy
“As longstanding critiques have insisted, figures such as GDP, which measure economic activity via the paid economy, also ignore the vast quantities of unpaid social reproductive labor without which society cannot survive.”
So, let's be clear, it's NOT about promoting a response to this epidemic and ignoring the economic impact it is causing it has never been markets v. lives. 4/
We need our leaders to protect those who cannot social distance because they are in our prisons and jails or living on the street or in homeless shelters. This is where social solidarity is most needed and most in short supply. #coronavirus
This piece from and makes some similar points about #COVID19 and "The Economy" and is well-worth reading
. & I spent the past few weeks thinking through how we got into this mess and how we move forward against the virus and for a better future now. #COVID19
Claims that the cure is worse than the disease rely on a false tradeoff between human needs and the economy. Our latest from and on #COVID19
Demands to "restart" the U.S. by sacrificing the most vulnerable suggest a false tradeoff between human needs and the economy.
Thousands of people who don't grow the GDP do productive work. The most productive thing we can do now is stay home. Maybe it's time we rethink how we measure productivity
My colleagues ⁦⁩ and ⁦⁩ are making themselves essential in this moment. Please read and share.
"This is a massive task. Nothing really prepares us for it. But we’ve got to grab the wheel, and with a groaning, wide, ungainly sweep of the rudder, turn this country around as if our lives depended on it—because they do."
I hope economists don't think said the wrong things here. If we did, let us know and we'll correct.