This, from , is the best analysis I've seen on what happened in Italy.
Lombardy has 5000 covid-19 deaths. Neighboring Veneto, with 1/2 the population, has 287 deaths. One difference is that in Lombardy, they send covid-19 patients to hospitals. In Veneto, they treat them in their homes.
One of the better articles about the virus. In a nutshell: Recognize your cognitive biases. Avoid partial solutions. Learning is critical. Data is important. Conclusions: There is no time to waste An effective approach requires a war-like mobilization
Recommends against piecemeal shutdowns which is exactly what America is doing.
Single best article below on Italy. Please read. My colleagues explore how human inability to consider nonlinear events, fragmented responses, inadequate data, & missed chances to learn contributed to the crisis. We’re doing the same in US.
It is essential to consider different policies as “experiments,” rather than personal or political battles, and to adopt a mindset that facilitates learning from past and current experiences in dealing with Covid-19 as effectively and rapidly as possible
Este artículo es un IMPRESCINDIBLE "Lecciones de la respuesta de Italia al Corona Virus" Harvard Business Review En este hilo comparto mi selección/lectura de puntos importantes (pero sugiero leer la fuente) Imágenes agregadas x mi #coronavirus 1/10
L'Italia è oggi l'epicentro dell'epidemia. Sulla Harvard Business Review, Gary Pisano, e (Harvard University) suggeriscono al resto del mondo alcune regole semplici per evitare di ripetere gli errori commessi in Italia: . 👇 1/
“The best time to take strong action is extremely early, when the threat appears to be small. But if the intervention actually works, it will appear in retrospect as if the strong actions were an overreaction — a game many politicians don’t want to play.”
“The most effective time to take strong action is extremely early, when the threat appears to be small—or even before there are any cases. But if the intervention actually works, it will appear in retrospect as if the strong actions were an overreaction.”
Lessons from Italy’s Response to Coronavirus #COVID19
ICYMI, I strongly recommend reading this article by Gary Pisano, , and on Italy's response to the #coronavirus: #COVID19 #COVID2019
"The most effective time to take strong action is extremely early, when the threat appears to be small — or even before there are any cases".
Excellent article re: #COVID19 insights from Italy. Key lessons: - Extensive testing, - Proactive contact tracing, - Emphasis on home diagnosis & care, - Monitor & protect health care & other essential staff. 1/...
"The initial state-of-emergency declarations were met by skepticism by both the public and many in policy circles — even though several scientists had been warning of the potential for a catastrophe for weeks." -Lessons from Italy.
What worked (Veneto) 'Proactive tracing of potential positives. If someone tested positive, everyone in that patient’s home as well as their neighbors were tested. If testing kits were unavailable, they were self-quarantined.'
Congrats to and colleagues on this great take
“hospitals traditionally organized to deliver patient-centric care are ill-equipped to deliver the type of community-focused care needed during a pandemic”
Proud of this first article by ⁦⁩ and the group looking into best practices and how to improve response to #coronavirus #covid19 #SARSCoV2 from a management & logistics perspective. stay tuned: more to come! ❤️
Un articolo molto efficace di su sugli errori del processo decisionale nella gestione dell'emergenza #coronavirus in Italia
hospitals traditionally organized to deliver patient-centric care are ill-equipped to deliver the type of community-focused care needed during a pandemic.
Lessons from Italy’s Response to #Coronavirus. “systematic inability to listen to experts highlights the trouble that leaders have figuring out how to act in dire, highly complex situations where there’s no easy solution” #COVID19 ⁦⁦
As with all big problems, we can only respond appropriately if we have data. This is one of the 'Lessons from Italy’s Response to Coronavirus’ – a very good text.
Best piece I've read. Big failures in climbing the learning curve during this crisis (not only across countries but even across neighbouring regions within country). When short term economic concerns take over..
Compelling Reading: Lessons from #Italy’s Response to Coronavirus --the comparison between Lombardy and Veneto is devastating in from #COVID19
Lessons from Italy’s Response to Coronavirus - lessons US urgently needs to learn = recognize your cognitive biases = collect &disseminate data = avoid partial solutions = learn from successes &failures, &adjust actions accordingly via ⁦@H⁩arvardBiz
Nice organizational behavior analysis: Lessons from Italy's Response to Coronavirus - Harvard Business Review
Lessons from Italy’s Response to Coronavirus
HBS academics emphasise some key lessons from the Italian experience of COVID-19, including, that "a shift is urgently needed from patient-centered models of care to a community-system approach that offers pandemic solutions for the entire population"
Por ejemplo, aquí Our World in Data explica la importancia de las pruebas Y aqui investigadores de Harvard describen el exito de Veneto vs Lombardia con mas pruebas
Lessons from Italy’s Response to #coronavirus via
require a decision-making approach ... that is systemic, prioritizes learning, and is able to quickly scale successful experiments and identify and shut down the ineffective ones.
Excellent read - "Together, the need for immediate action and for massive mobilization imply that an effective response to this crisis will require a decision-making approach that is far from business as usual."
The Italian #Covid_19 crisis looked nothing like a crisis. The initial state-of-emergency declarations were met by skepticism in many policy circles — even though several scientists had been warning of the potential for a catastrophe for weeks.
CAUTIONARY TALE: sfortuna (“bad luck” in Italian) Lessons from Italy’s Response to Coronavirus
Thanks. Yes, for the US I’m also not optimistic. For some other countries I am though. And the Italian experience might suggest that it is possible that some regions within the US might be able to do better
Good analysis by - "Lessons from Italy’s Response to Coronavirus: Recognize your cognitive biases; Avoid partial solutions; Learning is critical; Collecting and disseminating data is important; A Different Decision-Making Approach"
Lessons from Italy’s Response to Coronavirus - brilliant piece, and very relevant to the U.K.
Las lecciones de Italia: dejar al lado los procesos de toma de decision normales, actuar rápido, con acciones sin precedente, y de manera sistemática y coordinada. La alternativa es el desastre.
Lessons from Italy’s Response to Coronavirus - via Harvard Business Review #covid19 #covid19usa #covid19italy
“the striking discrepancy in mortality rates between Italy and other countries and within Italian regions may (at least in part) be driven by different testing approaches“. Good analysis to learn from.
If these lessons from Italy provide an early "scorecard", how is the U.S. doing so far?
Lessons learned from Italy: #COVID19
Interesting article on the lessons from Italy. The authors suggest there was "a systematic failure to absorb and act upon existing information rapidly and effectively rather than a complete lack of knowledge of what ought to be done"