New paper with "How decisions and the desire for coherency shape subjective preferences over time". We find people's preferences align to match their choices, which in turn guides future decisions. 1/n
We aren't aiming to create a political war, but this coherency effect was much stronger in self-identified Republicans (all participants were from the US). We discuss some reasons why this drive for coherency may be stronger in this group. 4/n
In a study with well-controlled stimuli and a second with political materials, we find that an initial choice leads to increased preference for a randomly assigned aspect of that choice that was unknown to participants at the time of decision. 2/n
In our model, preferences (in a multidimensional space) update by gradient descent such that the same or a related choice (i.e., generalization to unseen options) becomes more likely to occur in the future; maintaining coherency. 6/6
It's speculative, but our experiment results, which randomly assign positions (clean design), may relate to real-world partisan divides on issues in which political leaders strongly espouse a certain position. 5/n
For example, someone may vote for a candidate because they like cats more than dogs. Later, supporters then agree with the candidate when they reveal positions on unrelated topics, such as abortion or trade policy. 3/n
How decisions and the desire for coherency shape subjective preferences over time - ScienceDirect