"At Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx, Dr. Nicholas Caputo followed 50 patients who arrived with low oxygen levels between 69 and 85 percent (95 is normal). After five minutes of proning, they had improved to a mean of 94 percent."
Less ventilators. More 'Swan Lake.' After a month at the white-hot center of the pandemic, what doctors wish they'd known in early March. About New York.
In police work this would be called a “clue”: “Never in my life have I had to ask a patient to get off the telephone bc it was time to put in a breathing tube,” said Dr. Richard Levitan, who recently spent 10 days at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan.
oxygen >>>>> intubation as docs quickly learn from just 30 days ago on how to better handle serious COVID-19 cases (h/t: )
Emergency med is known for its ingenuity, & it's saving lines from #COVID19. But: “Everyone’s got an observation,” Dr. Strayer said. “Everyone’s got an opinion. It’s not very useful. What matters is science and we don’t have any yet.”
Improvements in care like this are why it’s really valuable to delay the surge in cases, even by a month.
What Doctors on the Front Lines Wish They’d Known a Month Ago
Interesting article by ⁦⁩ on what hospitals are learning about general care from treating COVID-19 patients via
Doctors in NY are using proning (having low oxygen patients stay conscious and breathe on their sides/bellies) to avoid intubation.
. on the lessons doctors have learned over the past month. One big surprise: intubating might be less useful than first thought, and "proning" a better alternative
#COVID19 is hard on everyone. Including the physicians via
Adaptive docs are shifting from ventilators to noninvasive "proning" for treating Covid patients. (Along with apparently working better for the patients, it makes the ventilator shortage far less of a problem.)
What Doctors on the Front Lines Wish They’d Known a Month Ago. Ironclad emergency medical practices — about when to use ventilators, for example — have dissolved almost overnight. By #COVID19 #MedEd
Hopeful: not a miracle drug but doctors figuring out how to help patients breathe and avoid ventilators
Bij Covid-19 niet te snel aan de ventilator, eerst proberen met "proning": What Doctors on the Front Lines Wish They’d Known a Month Ago
What Doctors on the Front Lines Wish They’d Known a Month Ago via
exciting that small advances in clinical practice could help many patients, and reduce how many dangerous intubation are needed. report ⁦⁩ What Doctors on the Front Lines Wish They’d Known a Month Ago
#coronavirus' forced learning curve: "What Doctors on the Front Lines Wish They’d Known a Month Ago"
Fascinating information about what we now know about how to respond to coronavirus. Placing people on their stomach has a significant impact
"What Doctors on the Front Lines Wish They’d Known a Month Ago"via
"Never in my life have I had to ask a patient to get off the telephone because it was time to put in a breathing tube” What doctors are learning on the fly about COVID-19
What Doctors on the Front Lines Wish They’d Known a Month Ago - The New York Times