In the early 1800s, popular demand for information during a pandemic helped birth the scientific journal as we know it. That crisis helped to #openscience and for the long term, as #COVID19 stands to again.
"...even the best peer-reviewed advice is likely to change — and change again. That’s how science works, and now it’s working faster than ever."
Open Access is to play a crucial role in accelerating the pace of scientific and medical research, in the wake of the #coronavirus crisis, while ensuring unfettered access to trusted scholarly information and latest research results for the general public
"What typically takes many months is happening in weeks, even as some journals are receiving double their normal number of submissions."
Prof Alex Csiszar puts role of scientific journals in context. via ⁩ ⁦⁩ ⁦
“The questions that we want answers to are much more complicated than the evidence that we have at any one moment.”[email protected] Slow science is better science, but sometimes speed is necessary. Trust the process, but recognize route will be curvy one.
Advice for general readers of COVID-19 papers: "But also remember that even the best peer-reviewed advice is likely to change — and change again. That’s how science works, and now it’s working faster than ever."
"If we put our faith in a single conclusion, it’s easy to feel distressed when it’s amended. If we trust the process, imperfect though it is, we’re better prepared to change with it, which is the most we can hope to do."
“remember that even the best peer-reviewed advice is likely to change — and change again. That’s how science works, and now it’s working faster than ever. If we put our faith in a single conclusion, it’s easy to feel distressed when it’s amended”
Coronavirus Is Forcing Medical Research to Speed Up
Coronavirus Is Forcing Medical Research to Speed Up - The New York Times
Nice article highlighting the interplay between speed of information distribution and reliability of the information. Bonus quotes from colleagues and !
“What we can say with confidence is the best available evidence is what’s coming through the journals, but the best available evidence is far, far short of certainty,” and the decisions that we make about the evidence have “to embrace the uncertainty.”
For journal editors, "both daunting and full of considerable responsibility" --> #COVID19 Is Forcing Medical Research to Speed Up
Science is discovery, not prophecy. It changes as we learn; each proclamation isn’t a revelation from an infallible source. That can frustrating at times, but it’s the best road to truth, curves and all.