My story today. Still not much room at the top of DOD leadership for anyone who isn’t white and male. via
"Some 43 percent of the 1.3 million men and women on active duty in the United States military are people of color. But...of the 41 most senior commanders in the military, only two are black."
“You would have thought it was 1950.” Nearly 75 years after integration, the U.S. military’s upper echelons are still dominated by white men.
43% percent of the 1.3 million men and women on active duty in the United States military are people of color. But the top brass are almost entirely white and male.
On this Memorial Day, a sobering look by ⁦⁩ at the predominantly white leadership of the military. While 43% of those on active duty are people of color, just two of the top 41 most senior commanders are black and one is Asian American.
On Memorial Day, ⁦⁩ delivered a journalistic tour de force on the stunning absence of diversity among military top brass. No better way to honor those who died than to assure the leadership looks like America. We’ve backslid on this.
I study African Americans and World War I. Over 100 years later racist ideas of black officers and their leadership capabilities still continue to exist. A reminder that the military has always been an institution deeply rooted in white male supremacy.
African-Americans Are Highly Visible in the Military, but Almost Invisible at the Top - The New York Times
More than 40% of active duty military are people of color, yet the DoD leadership is almost entirely white. This is wrong.
I first started thinking about #racializedorganizations when studying the military. via
African-Americans Are Highly Visible in the Military, but Almost Invisible at the Top. “The Army in particular is a pretty bubba-oriented system,” said Derek Chollet, a former assistant secretary of defense.
African-Americans Are Highly Visible in the Military, but Almost Invisible at the Top. #BlackOfficersMatter
This structural racism in the military is not surprising given my research that shows the military targets Black Americans for recruitment. They serve disproportionately in the Armed Forces but do not get promoted to high ranks.
African-Americans Are Highly Visible in the Military, but Almost Invisible at the Top via